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Blackburn College

History and Politics with Foundation Entry

UCAS Code: QF70

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

32

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Politics

Our BA (Hons) History and Politics with Foundation Entry degree course is designed for students who want to study History and Politics, but don’t have the necessary formal qualifications to start the Honours degree programme just yet.

This History and Politics BA (Hons) course enables you to study both History and Politics equally at the same level. Don't worry, studying joint honours doesn't mean more work. You'll study the same number of credits as a single honours student, but just take fewer modules in each of the subjects. There are lots of reasons why students choose a joint honours qualification. Just some include: that you have two subject areas of interest, that you want to explore something new alongside a core subject area or that you want to keep your career options open to a range of professions.

Our Modern History programme is designed to introduce you to the essential skills of the historian, including an understanding of current debates and perspectives, alongside an ability to contextualise history from a local and global viewpoint. This is complemented by the necessary acquisition of advanced research and analytical skills, set against substantive material drawn from modern history from the eighteenth century to the present day. The degree is designed to help you form a deeper understanding of the relationship of the social and cultural present with that of the past. This degree also helps you develop powers of analysis and problem solving, research skills, critical thinking, team work and interpersonal skills.

The Politics programme is stimulating, interesting and contemporary, and quickly develops students' own powers of analysis and problem solving, research skills, critical thinking, team work and interpersonal skills. It is designed to help you to form a deeper understanding of the Politics of Britain and the wider world, whilst exploring the world of the political, within the complex power relationships of contemporary society. In the first year you will take a common core of introductory modules designed to familiarise yourself with differing approaches to the study of Politics, to help you understand key theories, concepts and ideas and to understand some of the key debates and issues in the world around us. At second and third level students can choose from a range of modules to reflect developing interests and potential career choices.

Modules

All students take a total of 120 credits per level.

Level 3 Modules (all modules are mandatory) include:
?Preparing for HE
?World in Crisis? Foundation in Social Science
?Foundation in Modern History

Level 4 Modules (all modules are mandatory) include:
?Studying History: Sources Methods & Interpretations
?British Social & Economic History 1750-1939
?Place in the Sun: Europe & the Race for Empire
?Introduction to Political Theory
?Introduction to British Government & Politics
?Comparative Politics

Level 5 Modules (there are 3 mandatory modules and 3 optional modules out of a choice of 6 as indicated by *) include:
?Never Had it So Good: Britain (1945-1979)
?Social Science Research Methods with SPSS
?New Politics in Britain

Choose 2 History modules from the optional modules below
?The Long 18th Century in Perspective*
?Local History*
?Total Warfare: World Wars I & II in Perspective*

and Choose 1 Politics modules from the optional modules below:
?Local and Regional Government*
?Political Ideas and the Making of the Modern World:
Western Perspective*
?Politics and Government of the USA*

Level 6 Modules (there is 1 mandatory module and 4 optional modules out of a choice of 9 as indicated by *) include:
?Dissertation

Choose 2 History modules from the optional modules below:
?Witchcraft and Magic in Early Modern England*
?Sport in British Society*
?From Medieval to Modern: A History of Ideas*
?Debates on the Russian Revolution*
?The History of British Women (1800-2000)*

and Choose 2 Politics modules from the optional modules below
?Saving the world: Green Politics, Green Society*
?International Relations and Globalisation*
?United States’ Foreign Policy and the Making of a New Global Order*
?Riots, Disorders and Responses of the State*

Assessment methods

At Level 3 study your assessment is designed to give you a flavour of how you will be assessed in the later stages of the programme.

Modules in at Level 4 study are assessed by both examinations (50%) and coursework (50%). Level 5 and 6 modules are also assessed by examination and coursework combinations. You can also expect to take part in seminar presentations which will form part of the assessment for Level 5 and 6 modules. In the third year, you will undertake a dissertation which is assessed through coursework (100%).

Each module is formally assessed through, for example, examination, open-book test, individual and group presentation, essay, observation of practice, assessment of course work e.g. art portfolio, written report, reflective practice and portfolios of evidence. This formal assessment will count towards your module mark and feedback is usually given within 3 weeks following the submission of your formal submission of work.

Additionally, some lecturers will provide informal feedback, for example, following an examination they may choose to work through the exam paper in a tutorial. It should be noted that feedback is part of the ongoing learning cycle which is not limited to written feedback. Other forms of feedback include one-to-one meetings with a personal tutor, dissertation and project supervision meetings, a lecturer responding to learner questions or responses during topic or situation discussions.

Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

The Uni


Course location:

Blackburn College

Department:

Art and Society

TEF rating:
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Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Politics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£16k

£16k

£18k

£18k

£16k

£16k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

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Graduate field commentary:

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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