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Law

Entry requirements


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About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Other options

3.0 years | Part-time | 2021

Subject

Law

Our LLB Law course is a qualifying law degree. That means it’s recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Council as the first step on your journey to becoming a qualified solicitor or barrister.

Our tutors will also help you to find work experience that’s suited to your interests. Our location means that London, and all the opportunities it offers, is within easy reach. You’ll also benefit from our small classes, supportive and experience tutors, and valuable networking opportunities.

**Why study this subject?**
Law is one of the most complex and fascinating systems in the world. It’s constantly evolving to reflect and adapt to social attitudes.

Careers in law are varied and challenging. An LLB (Hons) Law degree will help you develop the knowledge and skills to meet those challenges head on and build a successful career.

**Why study at Buckinghamshire New University?**
Our lecturers are practitioners as well as academics, bringing depth and different perspectives to your studies. They also work with industry and professional bodies to develop our curriculum and the course modules, which include finance, company law, family law, criminal justice, employment law, media, and criminal justice.

This LLB Law degree will help you develop, not only the core knowledge and understanding of the substance and processes of many areas of law, but also high-level skills in communication, analysis, problem-solving and research, which are essential in many other areas of life.

A degree in Law is a challenging course, but it is one that brings great rewards during and after the course. Many of our students have told us how they have been transformed and empowered by the experience with us and have gone on to do things that they never thought they would have been able to.

**What will I study?**
Among the subjects you'll study are the ‘foundation’ subjects of Law: Criminal law, Contract law, Tort, Public law, European Union law, Land law and Equity and trusts.

This means that our LLB is recognised as a “Qualifying Law Degree” (QLD) by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Council, and so satisfies the first stage of qualification as a solicitor or barrister.

**How will I be taught and assessed?**
The course is underpinned by classroom-based teaching of current theory, concepts and research, delivered through a blend of lectures, interactive seminars and workshops, small-group activities and debates.

Lectures are used to provide frameworks within which you can develop your learning and understanding. They are primarily lecturer-led but interactive in style. Dependent upon level and content, they may include student-based activity and will always provide opportunity for you to raise questions.

The frameworks delivered within the lecture sessions include those of method, concept, rule, policy, and (legal) cultural norms. You're provided with study guides and other written materials to support your learning. You can also use the virtual learning environment to complement the teaching.

Seminars and workshops are student-centred. Seminars provide a context for the examination and use of knowledge gained in plenary sessions and in private study. They are based upon case-study based problems, questions and research activities that are set out in study materials.

You're expected to read, research, and prepare answers for the seminar or workshop questions. Information and ideas are exchanged and discussed. Difficulties and uncertainties are addressed.

A variety of assessments are used, all designed to mirror ‘real world’ legal issues, problems and situations and allow you to demonstrate the skills you’ve acquired.

Some modules contain specific forms of assessment applicable only to that module: for instance, the Court Day reflective account; the legal advice session; assessment by submission of a portfolio of work; viva examinations; and preparation of CVs and career plans.

Modules

Year One: Law of Contract, Criminal Law, English Legal System, Professional Skills 1, EU Constitutional & Procedural Law, Professional Skills 2. Year Two: Business Analytics, Economic Analysis, Knowledge of Policing, Law of Tort, Public Law, EU Internal Market Law, Professional Skills 3, Business Organisations, Criminal Justice, Media Law 1, Employment Law, Family Law, Intellectual Property Law 1. Year Three: Equity and Trusts, Law of Property, Research Project, Dissertation.

The Uni


Course locations:

Uxbridge Campus

Buckinghamshire New University

Aylesbury Campus

Department:

School of Business, Law and Computing

Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

98%
UK students
2%
International students
38%
Male students
62%
Female students
64%
2:1 or above
26%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

E
D
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education

Top job areas of graduates

21%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
13%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
9%
Legal associate professionals

Law graduates tend to go into the legal industry, and they usually take similar routes. Jobs are competitive — often very competitive - but starting salaries are good and high fliers can earn serious money - starting on over £24k in London on average. Be aware though - some careers, especially as barristers, can take a while to get into, and the industry is changing as the Internet, automation and economic change all have an effect, If you want to qualify to practise law, you need to take a professional qualification — many law graduates then go on to law school. If you want to go into work, then a lot of law graduates take trainee or paralegal roles and some do leave the law altogether, often for jobs in management, finance and the police force. A small proportion of law graduates also move into another field for further study. Management, accountancy and teaching are all popular for these career changers, so if you do take a law degree and decide it’s not for you, there are options.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Law

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£23k

£23k

£26k

£26k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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Lower entry requirements
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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here