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City, University of London

Aeronautical Engineering (with Professional Placement)

UCAS Code: H401

Bachelor of Engineering (with Honours) - BEng (Hon)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

including A level Mathematics

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

32

including Higher Level Mathematics at grade 5 OR 32 points total, including Higher Level Physics/Biology/Chemistry at grade 5 and Standard Level Mathematics at grade 7.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

D*DD

in Engineering (First teaching Sept 2016) with minimum grade D in units 1 - Engineering Principles, 7 - Calculus to Solve Engineering Problems and 8 - Further Engineering Mathematics. Candidates must also have a minimum of grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics and Science/Physics.

UCAS Tariff

120

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Aeronautical engineering

This course prepares students for an exciting and rewarding career in the global aerospace industry, working on manned and unmanned aircraft and spacecraft projects. This degree places particular emphasis on encouraging and enabling students to be innovative in their engineering design.

The course is designed in collaboration with industry, which is directly reflected in the emphasis on the professional and transferrable skills you will learn. The BEng (Hons) Aeronautical Engineering degree has been developed to educate you in the design, analysis and testing of aeronautical and aerospace vehicles and associated technology.

City was the first institution in the UK to introduce Aeronautical Engineering courses. The department has strong links with industry (local, national and global), maintaining partnerships through research projects and student placements.

Students are strongly encouraged to take a 12-month industrial placement between the end of year three and the start of their final year. Specialist advisors within the School are in regular contact with companies to assist students in finding suitable work experience. Student s are paid while on placement and are visited by their personal tutor during this time. Following placement, students more fully appreciate the context and relevance of their university studies and gain a greater understanding of the industry they are about to join. This valuable experience may count towards the requirements for a professional engineering qualification. In recent years Aeronautical Engineering students have been able to obtain placements at leading companies within their chosen field such as Airbus, DHL Air, British Airways, Delphi and EDF Energy.

Aeronautical Engineering graduates work in all areas of the aircraft and airline industries and in other high-tech industries, such as motor manufacturing, F1 design, tall building design and offshore oil and gas extraction. Careers in aeronautical engineering in the UK are provided by larger companies such as Leonardo Helicopters, Airbus, BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce and QinetiQ and many successful specialist companies that supply components and services.

Modules

Our courses are reviewed regularly to respond to the priority needs of the engineering marketplace, meeting the requirements of the Engineering Council. Students learn from academic staff from the Fluid Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interaction Research Centres, supported by specialist professionals from industry.

Year one is common to all of the engineering courses. Students study the science (largely physics) and mathematics that underpin engineering principles. They are also instructed in how to develop computer programs to (i) solve numerical analysis problems and (ii) control mechatronic systems.

Students begin to specialise in Aeronautical Engineering in year two, advancing their knowledge of solid and fluid mechanics while also studying measurement, data analysis and mechatronics. Students registered on the BEng degree, who average at least 60 per cent at the end of year two, are encouraged to transfer to the MEng degree.

The third year places increasing emphasis on aircraft design. Modules include aerodynamics and propulsion, flight dynamics and control, structural analysis and thermodynamics and heat transfer.

Assessment methods

The balance of assessment by examination, practical examination and assessment by coursework will to some extent depend on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessment, based on 2018/19 entry is as follows:

- Year 1
Written examination: 63% ? Coursework: 37%
- Year 2
Written examination: 60% ? Coursework: 40%
- Year 3
Written examination: 48% ? Coursework: 52%

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£19,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

City, University of London

Department:

Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

78%
med
Aeronautical engineering

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Aeronautical engineering

Teaching and learning

64%
Staff make the subject interesting
91%
Staff are good at explaining things
77%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
77%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

91%
Library resources
90%
IT resources
91%
Course specific equipment and facilities
68%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

76%
UK students
24%
International students
84%
Male students
16%
Female students
44%
2:1 or above
20%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Aeronautical engineering

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£26,000
med
Average annual salary
78%
low
Employed or in further education
61%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

33%
Engineering professionals
8%
Transport associate professionals
8%
Business, research and administrative professionals

Just over a thousand UK graduates got a degree in aerospace engineering in 2015. There are a few dedicated employers, unevenly spread around the country, and so there's often competition for graduates looking for their first job - which leads to a relatively high (although improving) early unemployment rate, and a good grade is particularly important for graduates. Sponsorship and work experience can be key if you're after the most sought-after roles in the industry. Starting salaries are usually good and graduates commonly go into the aerospace (yes, this does include manufacture of equipment for satellites and space operations) and defence industries. Bear in mind that a lot of courses are four years long, and lead to an MEng qualification — this is necessary if you want to become a Chartered Engineer.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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