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City, University of London

Politics

UCAS Code: L200

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

BBB A level General Studies, Critical Thinking and Citizenship are not accepted

Access to HE Diploma

D:27,M:18

We welcome Access course applicants from 'mature' students. These applicants will be considered on the basis of their own merits. A typical offer for an Access applicant would be: Pass 60 credits, 45 of which at Level 3. These Level 3 credits must include at least 27 at distinction and 18 at merit. It is essential the Access course qualification is supplemented by at least a grade B in Mathematics and English Language at GCSE. Please be aware that Access students are often asked for further information to supplement their application, this is normally in the form of a questionnaire.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

English Language and Mathematics or Statistics at grade 4 (C) or equivalent

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

30

including no less than 5, 5, 5 in three Higher Level subjects

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDD

Check with the Department for acceptable subjects

UCAS Tariff

120

120 tariff points from 3 A levels or 3 A levels and 1 EPQ

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Politics

Understand and analyse the key political issues that characterise twenty-first century politics and develop valuable, transferable skills that will prepare you for a wide range of career and postgraduate study options.

This course has been developed for students who want to analyse, in a systematic and comparative way, the key political problems and issues that face states and societies across the world.

You will develop vital analytical skills that are theoretically rigorous and empirically informed. You will learn how to apply these skills to explain today’s key issues, such as uneven economic growth and rising inequality, political violence, civil war and a shifting balance of global economic and political power.

The degree programme will equip you with the tools you need to be competitive in a world where strategic thinking is prized and analysis of political risks highly valued. The programme is geared to helping you graduate with the understanding, skills and experience that will prepare you for postgraduate study or careers in a range of governmental, corporate, non-governmental and international organisations engaged in addressing these challenges.

Why are some countries becoming democratic while democracy is failing in others? How is political power distributed in different societies around the world? How has globalisation reshaped state and market institutions in different countries? Why do different countries have different political systems? Why have far-right parties been successful in increasing their electoral support in some countries but not in others? When do social protests against governments emerge and when do they succeed?

In today’s increasingly interconnected world, understanding the central issues and trends that characterise twenty-first century politics requires students to look beyond the borders of any single nation and adopt a global perspective. The Politics BSc (Hons) at City will provide you with the analytical skills, and theoretical and methodological tools that will help you address the key questions that are central to understanding politics today.

The BSc (Hons) Politics will enable you to:

- Investigate how national politics influences global political phenomena.

- Develop strong analytical skills, learning how to compare political phenomena taking place in different countries to improve your knowledge of contemporary politics.

- Broaden your regional and country-level expertise with a range of modules on the politics of emerging powers.

This course will challenge you to apply the key theories and approaches of the politics discipline to explore the diversity of political processes and political systems across different countries and regions of the world.

Plus, to prepare you for a wide range of future career and postgraduate study possibilities, you will benefit from our location within a department with a strong international focus, and our exciting opportunities for work placement and studying abroad.

Modules

The first year is made up of 120 credit (all modules are 15 credits).

You will take six core modules, which will provide you with a foundation in the main issues, concepts, and theoretical perspectives of politics, comparative politics and political theory.

In addition, you will choose two elective modules from a wide range of topics that are directly relevant to the study of politics. These are offered by the Department of International Politics, as well as other departments in the School of Arts and Social Science. In addition, you have the option of taking one foreign language course.

Compulsory core modules core (all modules are 15 credits each)

Introduction to Politics
Puzzles of Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Theory
Emerging Powers in a Changing World
Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics: Making Sense of Social Data
Producing Social Data.

The second year consists of modules that make up 120 credits. You will take two core modules, plus six elective modules (all modules are 15 credits).

During the second year, you will take two compulsory modules. One to consolidate your understanding of the key theories, approaches and concepts and another to develop your scholarly writing.

In addition to these two core modules you will be able to choose six elective modules – four must be chosen from a list of modules pertaining to the field of politics/comparative politics with the purpose of building your specialised knowledge in the subject field you are studying. The remaining electives can be chosen from a broader selection of modules.

Programme core modules (All modules are 15 credits each):

Scholarly Writing
Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics
Choose at least 60 credits (4 modules) from:

Political Risk Analysis
Politics of the USA
Comparative Asian Politics
Comparative Political Economy
Religion and Politics in the Age of Global Change
Violent politics: riots, civil wars and state repression
Political Psychology: Emotion & Reason in Politics.

Year three is made up of 120 credits. You will take six modules – one core module (45 credits) and 5 elective modules (total equivalent of 75 credits).

You will be able to apply the skills you have acquired during the first two years to your final year dissertation – a sustained piece of independent research on a subject of your choice within the field of politics/comparative politics.

You will also choose two elective modules in the areas that interest you the most and in doing so, specialise within the wider field of politics/comparative politics.

Programme core module:

Final Year Dissertation Project

Assessment methods

The assessment weighting for year one is 10%, year two is 30% and year three is 60%.

You will be assessed by:
- Coursework (assessed essays and assignments)
- Unseen exams
- Oral presentations
- Other types of assessment methods that are suitable to specific modules.

In addition, the Politics BSc (Hons) involves two research projects:
- A 5,000-word research paper at the end of the second year
- A 10,000-word dissertation submitted at the end of your third year

The Uni


Course location:

City, University of London

Department:

Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

81%
med
Politics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

Teaching and learning

87%
Staff make the subject interesting
90%
Staff are good at explaining things
83%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
69%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

86%
Library resources
90%
IT resources
84%
Course specific equipment and facilities
80%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

58%
UK students
42%
International students
47%
Male students
53%
Female students
82%
2:1 or above
12%
Drop out rate

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,000
med
Average annual salary
92%
low
Employed or in further education
79%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

11%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
11%
Media professionals
8%
Business, finance and related associate professionals

The numbers of people taking politics degrees fell sharply last year and we'll keep an eye on this one - it can't really be because of graduates getting poor outcomes as politics grads do about as well as graduates on average. Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Jobs in local and central government are also important. Other popular jobs include marketing and PR, youth and community work, finance roles, HR and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Because so many graduates get jobs in the civil service, a lot of graduates find themselves in London after graduating. Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in five politics graduates go on to take another course - usually a one-year Masters - after they finish their degrees.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Politics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£28k

£28k

£25k

£25k

£29k

£29k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here