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English Language and English Literature

Entry requirements


A level

C-A*

in English Language or Literature

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

26

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

plus grade C or above in A Level English Language or Literature

UCAS Tariff

112

- From at least 2 A Levels including grade C or above in A Level English Language or Literature - Five GCSEs A*-C (9-4) including English Language or Literature

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subject

English studies

English Language and English Literature at DMU introduces you to an exciting range of theories and concepts in both subjects, providing a cohesive course in two complementary subjects. As well as developing subject specific knowledge of the English Language and English Literature, the degree aims to develop a range of key transferrable skills including the ability to use language adeptly and appropriately in any potential linguistic context, skills of textual analysis and synthesis, advanced digital literacy, and high-level research, writing and communication skills, which will be of clear benefit in equipping future graduates for a wide range of careers.

Study English Language and English Literature at DMU and join a lively and welcoming academic community. Get involved in the student-led English Literature and English Language societies, go on theatre trips in the UK or travel abroad with DMU Global as part of your course. Our graduates go into a wide range of professions including media, translation, marketing, publishing, teaching, public relations and the civil service.

**Key features:**

* Study language and literature in breadth and depth and learn new skills in a wide range of highly specialised modules covering a wide range of different subject areas such as words in action, poetry and society and sociolinguistics.

* Explore print and digital humanities by learning to use a hand printing press or gain practical training in HTML with options exploring the production of literary texts in manuscript, print and digital forms from DMU’s Centre for Textual Studies

* Broaden your knowledge base by studying not just English Language and English Literature, but also Creative Writing, with an opportunity to learn about the principles and practice of teaching English language

* Improve your employability by focusing on your career prospects through learning essential skills and knowledge and putting them to practical use. The final-year placement module allows you to gain work experience and develop your presentation and communication skills

* Our graduates have gone on to work at Meisei University in Tokyo, HomeStyle magazine, the BBC, Pan Macmillan and Penguin Random House.

* Develop a global understanding of English Language and Literature through an international experience with our DMU Global programme. Students have previously explored ekphrastic writing and themes of oppression in Berlin, as well as visiting TED HQ and key literary locations in New York.

Modules

"First year:

Core modules:
• Introduction to Drama: Shakespeare
• Words in Action
• Evolving Language

Optional modules:
• Introduction to English and Adaptation
• Poetry and Society
• Introduction to the Novel
• Topics in Linguistics: Theory in Practice
• Work-based Learning (Placement) Year

Second year:

Core module:
• Exploration and Innovation: 14th Century to 18th Century Literature

Optional modules:
• 20th and 21st Century Literature
• Ways of Reading
• Screen and Literary Adaptations of the Classics
• Romantic and Victorian Literature
• Text Technologies
• Sociolinguistics
• English Language in UK Schools
• Introducing English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
• Grammar: Analysing Linguistic Structure
• Semantics: Analysing Linguistic Meaning
• Research Methods for Linguists
• Phonetics and PhonologyLanguage in Context
• Erasmus Year

Third year

Core module:
• English Dissertation OR
• English Language Dissertation

Optional modules:
• Nineteenth-Century American Literature
• Contemporary Irish Writing
• The British Working Class in Literature, Film and Television
• Unruly Women, Revolutionary Men
• English in the Workplace
• Modernism and Modernity
• Staging the World: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries
• Medieval.com
• Sex and Death in Romantic Writing, 1780-1830
• Textual Studies Using Computers
• Radical and Contemporary Adaptations
• Biofiction: Writers’ afterlives
• Writing Adaptations: Theory and Practice
• English Language in the Workplace
• Powerful Language: An Introduction to Rhetoric
• Corpus Linguistics
• Language, Mind and Culture
• Perception, Persuasion, Power
• Language Acquisition"

Assessment methods

"Overview:
The English Language and English Literature undergraduate programme combines study of the history, structures, uses and context of English as a world language with study of literature in English from the medieval era to the 21st century.

The first year expands your knowledge via core modules on Shakespeare, grammar and the history of the English language as well as an option module either on poetry, the novel, adaptation, or linguistics.

The second year builds on these foundational modules. Your knowledge of literary history is deepened through study of the core module, which offers an overview of English literature from the 14th century to the early 18th century. Similarly, you have the chance to extend your knowledge of language, taking modules in sociolinguistics, grammar, semantics, phonology or linguistic research skills. In addition, you have the option to take further period-based literature modules on Romantic and Victorian literature and 20th and 21st-century literature or modules which offer you an introduction to other aspects of literary and linguistic study, including in our areas of special expertise, adaptations and digital humanities (Text Technologies), as well as on pragmatics and teaching English language (in UK schools and as a second language).

The third year allows you to specialise and to pursue particular areas of research interest. You complete a dissertation, either in English Language or English Literature. You then choose additional options from a wide-ranging selection of specialist literature and language options. This includes the option to take a work-based module in either Language or Literature and further options in adaptations and digital humanities.

Teaching sessions might be structured around discussion, working in small groups to analyse linguistic examples, a film screening or based in a computer lab depending on your module choices. You will complete reading and research in advance and join in conversation with your tutor and your peers. Individual tutorials with module tutors are available in weekly ‘office hours’, at which you can discuss any aspect of your course or get help with assignments. You will experience varied forms of assessment, including essays, presentations, exams, blogs, journals, websites, research reports and creative options.

You will be also assigned a Personal Tutor from the academic staff who will be available to meet students each term and to provide academic and pastoral support and advice. Personal Tutoring enables students to reflect synoptically on their academic experience. Learning in English Language and English Literature is also supported by the University Centre for Learning and Study Support (CLaSS), which offers regular workshops on a range of study skills. Teaching is enhanced by study skills sessions and there is an emphasis throughout year 1 (Level 4) especially on the key academic skills.

Contact hours:
You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work and self-directed study. Assessment is through coursework (presentations, essays and reports) and sometimes an exam. Your precise timetable will depend on the optional modules you choose to take, however, in your first year you will normally attend around 10 hours of timetabled taught sessions (lectures and tutorials) each week, and we expect you to undertake at least 27 further hours of independent study to complete project work and research."

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£14,250
per year
International
£14,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Leicester Campus

Department:

Arts, Design and Humanities

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

81%
med
English studies

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

English studies (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

81%
Staff make the subject interesting
97%
Staff are good at explaining things
81%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
86%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

76%
Library resources
95%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
84%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

90%
UK students
10%
International students
22%
Male students
78%
Female students
79%
2:1 or above
13%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

English studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
med
Average annual salary
99%
high
Employed or in further education
34%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

20%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
13%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
9%
Teaching and educational professionals

English is one of the most popular degree subjects and in 2015, more than 11,000 students graduated with English degrees - although this does represent a fall from recent years. As good communication is so important to modern business, you can find English graduates in all parts of the economy, although obviously, you can't expect to get a job in science or engineering (computing is a different matter - it's not common but good language skills can be useful in the computing industry). There's little difference in outcomes between English language and English literature degrees, so don't worry and choose the one that suits you best. More English grads took another postgraduate course when they finished their degree than grads from any other subject - this is an important option. Teacher training was a common choice of second degree, as was further study of English, and journalism courses. But many English graduates changed course and trained in law, marketing or other languages -or even subjects further afield such as computing, psychology and even nursing. This is a very flexible degree which gives you a lot of options

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

English studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£15k

£15k

£20k

£20k

£22k

£22k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
University of Huddersfield
Film Studies and English Literature
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Lower entry requirements
Edinburgh Napier University
English and Film
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
University of Leicester
English
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
De Montfort University
English and Creative Writing
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here