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Durham University

Ancient, Medieval and Modern History

UCAS Code: V101

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

A*,A,A

Specific subjects/grades required for entry: History at grade A. Specific subjects excluded for entry: General Studies and Critical Thinking. Information: Applicants taking Science A-levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This refers only to English A Levels.

Access to HE Diploma

D:30,M:15

We require 60 credits with a minimum of 45 credits at level 3 (or equivalent). At least 12 credits must be taken in History at Level 3 and passed with distinction.

Cambridge International Pre-U Certificate - Principal

D2,D3,D3

Must include History.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

38

18 points (6, 6, 6) in History at Higher Level and two other Higher Level subjects.

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H1,H2,H2,H2,H2

To include History

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

D*DD

Additionally an A Level in History at grade A OR BTEC Extended diploma DDD, and an A Level in History at grade A* Where A Levels are unavailable we also accept IB Higher Levels and Cambridge Pre-U’s as an alternative. Please contact us if you have a different Level 3 qualification you wish to use.

Scottish Advanced Higher

A,A,A

General information on subjects/grades required for entry: Must include History.

Scottish Higher

A,A,A,A,A

We will normally make offers based on Advanced Highers. If an applicant has not been able to take 3 Advanced Highers, offers may be made with a combination of Advanced Highers and Highers, or on a number of Highers.

UCAS Tariff

152-168

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Classical studies

**Year 1**
In the first year, you will take three modules from History and three from Classics. You must choose at least one History module which is either Medieval or Early Modern; and one which is Modern. The modules on offer reflect the research interests of staff.

History modules have previously included:
Reformation Europe
Tensions of Empire
The Birth of Western Society, 300-1050
New Heaven, New Earth: Latin Christendom and the World, 1000-1300.

In Ancient History, you will take two interdisciplinary modules that serve to give you a grounding in the central periods of Greek and Roman culture. Modules have previously included:
Remembering Athens
Monuments and Memory in the Age of Augustus

The third module is a matter of choice. Modules have previously included:
Intermediate Latin and Greek for those with an A level or equivalent
Greek Art and Architecture
Early Greek Philosophy
The Craft of the Ancient Historian.

**Year 2**
In the second year, you will take three modules from History and three from Classics. Second-year History modules tend to focus more on particular periods and events, and there are fewer survey courses. One of the History modules taken must be ‘Conversations with History’. This is a seminar-driven, student-led module, which encourages you to think about the way in which history is written. You will choose one from a range of possible strands in this module, each of which focuses on a particular historical debate or phenomenon. You must choose one History module which is either Medieval or Early Modern; and one which is Modern (the Conversations strand will count as one of these choices). There is no other restriction on choice.

Modules have previously included:
Conversations Strands: the Usable Past; the Built Environment
History and Guilt
Power and Peoples
Inventing the Middle Ages
Monarchy
Empire, Liberty and Governance.

Other modules have previously included:
Hard Times: British Society c. 1800-1901
Modern China’s Transformations
The American Half-century: the United States since 1945
The King’s Two Bodies: Rulership in Late Medieval Europe
The Ottoman World, 1400-1700.

In Ancient History, second-year historical offerings have previously included:
Archaic Greece
The Hellenistic World
Crisis of The Roman Republic
Roman Buildings and their Decoration.

**Year 3**
In the third year you may take the equivalent of three modules in each department, or you may take the equivalent of four modules in one and two in the other.

In History, you may choose a triple-module Special Subject, taught entirely through seminars, which involves the close study of primary sources. You will work in a small group with a specialist in the field, with a three-hour seminar every week. Or you may choose to do supervised independent research leading to the writing of an extended Dissertation. Given this emphasis on focused study and independence, there is no requirement for you to study a range of periods in this year.

Third-year single modules are all strongly reflexive in character, encouraging you to think about the ways in which historical knowledge is produced. Third-year History modules are all specialised, research-led topics.

Modules in History have previously included:
A World Turned Upside Down: Radicalism in the English Revolution
The Disappearance of Claudine Rouge: Murder, Mystery and Microhistory in Early Modern France
Light Beyond the Limes: the Christianization of Pagan Europe, 300-1000
From War to Cold War: US Foreign Policy, c. 1944-1948.

In Ancient History, have previously included:
Law and Society in Classical Athens
Roman Syria
The Later Roman Empire
Greeks and Persians
Urbs Roma
Writing Alexander.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year, and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2021.

Study Abroad option available: For more information on this course, please see our website.

Modules

Year 1
You will take three modules from History and three from Classics. You must choose at least one History module which is either Medieval or Early Modern; and one which is Modern. The modules on offer reflect the research interests of staff.

History modules have previously included:
Reformation Europe
Tensions of Empire
The Birth of Western Society, 300-1050
New Heaven, New Earth: Latin Christendom and the World, 1000-1300.

In Ancient History, you will take two interdisciplinary modules that serve to give you a grounding in the central periods of Greek and Roman culture. Modules have previously included:
Remembering Athens
Monuments and Memory in the Age of Augustus

The third module is a matter of choice. Modules have previously included:
Intermediate Latin and Greek for those with an A level or equivalent
Greek Art and Architecture
Early Greek Philosophy
The Craft of the Ancient Historian.

Year 2
You will take three modules from History and three from Classics. Second-year History modules tend to focus more on particular periods and events, and there are fewer survey courses. One of the History modules taken must be ‘Conversations with History’. This is a seminar-driven, student-led module, which encourages you to think about the way in which history is written. You will choose one from a range of possible strands in this module, each of which focuses on a particular historical debate or phenomenon. You must choose one History module which is either Medieval or Early Modern; and one which is Modern (the Conversations strand will count as one of these choices). There is no other restriction on choice.

Modules have previously included:
Conversations Strands: the Usable Past; the Built Environment
History and Guilt
Power and Peoples
Inventing the Middle Ages
Monarchy
Empire, Liberty and Governance.

Other modules have previously included:
Hard Times: British Society c. 1800-1901
Modern China’s Transformations
The American Half-century: the United States since 1945
The King’s Two Bodies: Rulership in Late Medieval Europe
The Ottoman World, 1400-1700.

In Ancient History, second-year historical offerings have previously included:
Archaic Greece
The Hellenistic World
Crisis of The Roman Republic
Roman Buildings and their Decoration.

Year 3
You may take the equivalent of three modules in each department, or you may take the equivalent of four modules in one and two in the other.

In History, you may choose a triple-module Special Subject, taught entirely through seminars, which involves the close study of primary sources. You will work in a small group with a specialist in the field, with a three-hour seminar every week. Or you may choose to do supervised independent research leading to the writing of an extended Dissertation. There is no requirement for you to study a range of periods in this year.

Third-year single modules are all strongly reflexive in character, encouraging you to think about the ways in which historical knowledge is produced. Third-year History modules are all specialised, research-led topics.

Modules in History have previously included:
A World Turned Upside Down: Radicalism in the English Revolution
The Disappearance of Claudine Rouge: Murder, Mystery and Microhistory in Early Modern France
Light Beyond the Limes: the Christianization of Pagan Europe, 300-1000
From War to Cold War: US Foreign Policy, c. 1944-1948.

In Ancient History, have previously included:
Law and Society in Classical Athens
Roman Syria
The Later Roman Empire
Greeks and Persians
Urbs Roma
Writing Alexander.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year, and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2021. Please note that the list of optional modules available in any year will vary depending on available teaching staff. The lists above provide an example of the type of modules which may be offered.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£22,100
per year
International
£22,100
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course locations:

Hatfield College

Van Mildert College

Stephenson College

St John's College

St Aidan's College

College of St Hild and St Bede

St Cuthbert's Society

St Chad's College

Josephine Butler College

No college preference

Collingwood College

St Mary's College

South College

Grey College

John Snow College

University College

Trevelyan College

Department:

Classics

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

88%
high
Classical studies

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Classical studies

Teaching and learning

91%
Staff make the subject interesting
89%
Staff are good at explaining things
88%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
78%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

77%
Library resources
90%
IT resources
90%
Course specific equipment and facilities
82%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

92%
UK students
8%
International students
41%
Male students
59%
Female students
97%
2:1 or above
2%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A
A
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Classical studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£25,000
high
Average annual salary
94%
med
Employed or in further education
50%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

25%
Business, research and administrative professionals
12%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
12%
Managers and proprietors in other services

This is a category for graduates taking a wide range of courses that don’t fall neatly into a subject group, so be aware that the stats you see here may not be a very accurate guide to the outcomes for the specific course you’re interested in. Management, finance, marketing, education and jobs in the arts are some of the typical jobs for these graduates, but it's sensible to go on open days and talk to tutors about what you might expect from the course, and what previous graduates did.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Classical studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£23k

£23k

£28k

£28k

£34k

£34k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here