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Glyndwr University, Wrexham

Equine Science and Welfare Management

UCAS Code: D422

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

Accepted alongside A-Levels as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

112 UCAS Tariff points

112 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

At least four GCSEs at grade C (including English and Maths).

112 UCAS Tariff points from International Baccalaureate Certificates

112 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted alongside Irish Leaving Certificate Higher Level as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

112 UCAS Tariff points

112 UCAS Tariff points

UCAS Tariff

112

Accepted as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff point requirement.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Equine studies

The relationship between horse and human is increasingly seen as central to the equestrian industry’s development – and this degree is one of a very select number in the UK which focuses on this.
This course is top in the UK for overall satisfaction and 5th in the UK for teaching satisfaction (WGU analysis of unpublished NSS 2019 data).
Based at our rural Northop campus, with access to excellent equestrian facilities, the degree builds on the university’s strong record of teaching in behavioural and equine science.
Students will:
• benefit from partnerships with local businesses to help you develop industry-relevant skills and experience
• enjoy guest speakers and educational visits throughout the course
• get free training for British Horse Society examinations alongside the degree, together with £100 towards an equine vocational examination of choice
• Free training alongside your degree and £100 towards the cost of British Horse Society qualifications.
• Apply new and existing scientific principles to the management and training of horses, whilst embracing equine welfare.
• Study at our rural Northop campus in the beautiful North Wales countryside, with access to excellent equestrian facilities, as well as making use of the amenities at the Wrexham campus, on the edge of the largest town in North East Wales
• Get ahead in the job market by gaining industry experience from work placements, educational visits and guest speakers.
• *Top in the UK for overall satisfaction and 5th in the UK for teaching satisfaction (WGU analysis of unpublished NSS 2019 data).

You can also choose to study this course as a foundation year BSc (Hons) Equine Science and Welfare Management including foundation year. UCAS code: 758d

Modules

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)
MODULES

• Biological Concepts.
• Stable Management (1)
• Professional Practice.
• Academic and Personal Development.
• Ethics and Welfare.
• Equine Behaviour and Cognition.

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)
MODULES
• Anatomy and Physiology.
• Learning and Training.
• Stable Management (2): This module builds on the stable management covered at level four, and includes the preparation of horses for varying disciplines, basic farriery equipment and hoof care and provides students with the opportunity to learn to lunge horses.
• Nutrition and Feeding Practice: This module will enable you to analyse the structure, role and value to the body of nutritional components of horse feed. You will learn how to critically analyse the composition of horse feed and the role of different feeds within the horse’s diet. You will also be taught how to calculate feed rations for horses of varying ages and for different levels of ‘work’.
• Research Methodologies: This module will enable you to understand the role of relevant research within the field of equine studies. In addition it will provide you with sufficient capability to plan a research project in your field of study, to define the research parameters, assess appropriate methodologies, and present your findings. You will learn how to examine and assess the appropriateness of different research methodologies to various research briefs and become aware of ethical and political issues in social research.
• Equine Health and Fitness: Students will assess equine conformation, health and disease in this module. Methods of getting horses fit and their physiological response to exercise will also be included. The module will be delivered through both theory and practice.

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)

MODULES

• Equine Reproduction and Young-stock Management: Students will explore the anatomy and physiology of reproduction in the mare and stallion, and to investigate the effect of modern reproductive techniques on reproductive success. Methods of handling and training young horses will also be included.
• Applied Research Skills and Professional Development: The module aims to equip students with the skills to evaluate research design critically as applicable to equine science and welfare management, to select and justify appropriate methods for data collection and analysis, and to reflect on personal development over the duration of the programme of study in preparation for future employment. Students will study the research process, and statistical analysis relevant to their field of study. They will also cover use of the statistical package SPSS.
• Research Project: This module aims to ensure students can critically evaluate research, and will guide students through the completion of a research-based study of a specialised area related to equine science and welfare management.
• Animal Behaviour Modification: The module aims to develop students’ awareness of the need for a systematic approach to understanding the aetiology of behavioural problems seen in horses. It will extend their understanding of how to analyse behavioural problems in horses and appreciate the limitations of relevant diagnostic techniques. It will also provide them with the opportunity to develop the necessary skills to suggest appropriate solutions to behavioural problems.
• Stress and Animal Welfare: The module enables students to explore how animal stress can be managed in a range of environments and situations. It also aims provide students with an understanding of the physiological and behavioural adaptations of animals resulting from modern use and husbandry.

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment methods

Module delivery is achieved through a combination of theoretical lectures, seminar discussions, guest lectures, educational visits, and practical work. Between lectures students are expected to read around their subjects making use of the detailed reading lists published in Module Guides. Each module is assessed in a variety of ways.

Assessment includes academic essays, research posters, presentations, seminar discussions and practical assessment. The balance between the different forms of assessment is determined by the different aims and learning outcomes of the modules.

TEACHING AND LEARNING

Wrexham Glynd?r University is committed to supporting our students to maximise their academic potential.

We offer workshops and support sessions in areas such as academic writing, effective note-making and preparing for assignments. Students can book appointments with academic skills tutors dedicated to helping deal with the practicalities of university work. Our student support section has more information on the help available.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,000
per year
Scotland
£9,000
per year
Wales
£9,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Northop

Department:

School of Social and Life Sciences

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Animal science

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

100%
UK students
0%
International students
0%
Male students
100%
Female students
61%
2:1 or above
15%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Animal science

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education

Top job areas of graduates

31%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
19%
Animal care and control services
15%
Other elementary services occupations

These stats refer to the prospects for graduates from both general animal studies courses and those for particular animals (such as equine science). Graduates don't generally get jobs as vets when they graduate; much the most common jobs tend to be roles caring for animals, such as veterinary nurses. Some of these jobs are not currently classified as professional level occupations, but in reality, you need a degree to get these jobs (and probably always have done), and graduates in them report that they got the jobs that they wanted. So the stats you see might not completely represent just how useful these degrees are for getting into animal care careers.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Agriculture & related subjects

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£14k

£14k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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