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Goldsmiths, University of London

Law

UCAS Code: M100

Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

A,B,B

Access to HE Diploma

D:33

60 credits overall with 33 distinctions and distinctions/merits in related subject

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDD

UCAS Tariff

128

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

This is a qualifying law degree - your first step towards becoming a solicitor or barrister in England and Wales. You’ll gain all the skills you need to progress to the next stages.

**Why study LLB Law at Goldsmiths?**

- Goldsmiths has a rich heritage of social awareness and engagement. You'll be part of an environment that champions human rights and social justice.

- Not only is it a qualifying law degree, it has been developed in anticipation of the new Solicitors Qualifying Examinations (SQE). Training for these is integrated throughout the degree and you'll also have the option to take a specific SQE2 module in your final year.

- Future lawyers need a diverse range of skills - we'll teach you about public speaking and drafting legal documentation, but we'll also get you mastering digital communications, big data, analytics and social media.

- This degree is active. You won't just be sitting and reading, you'll be problem-solving, debating and advocating through a range of experiential learning, extra-curricular and professional development activities, on campus and beyond.

- We're ahead of the curve. You'll cover the fundamentals, but you'll also look at subjects like post-Brexit regulation and disruptive technologies.

- You'll benefit from our excellence in the fields of creative arts, humanities and social sciences. You can choose modules in subjects as varied as art, media, human rights and technology.

- You'll have the chance to visit the Supreme Court and Old Bailey and attend Parliamentary committees and debates.

- Guest speakers will include legal academics, barristers, solicitors, judges, educational experts, stand-up comedians, technology experts and artists.

- The LLB Law is a qualifying law degree accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

**Law and Policy Clinics**
In Goldsmiths’ Law and Policy Clinics, students confront challenging societal issues through supervised legal research and public engagement activity.

Areas of research and public engagement activity covered by the Clinics include immigration, the law of financial wrongdoing, police interrogation, and counter-terrorism law.

Modules

The LLB will give you the opportunity to focus on your interests in the second and third year by choosing from a range of law option modules. A unique feature of the degree is that you'll also be able to study across a wide range of specialisms, drawing on globally leading expertise in the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Media and Communications, and Art.

Year 1 (credit level 4) you will study the following compulsory modules:
English Legal System in a Global Context
21st Century Legal Skills
Criminal Law
Contract Law
Public Law and the Human Rights Act

Year 2 (credit level 5) you will study 2 option modules and the following compulsory modules:
EU Law in the UK
Tort
Land Law
Trusts

Year 3 (credit level 6) you will write a dissertation (30 credits) and also choose 90 credits from a selection of optional modules from the following list:
Commercial Law and International Trade Agreements
Company Law
AI, Disruptive Technologies and the Law
Art Law
Media Law and Ethics
Criminal Evidence (with Advanced Mooting and Advocacy)
SQE2: Practical Legal Skills in Context
Human Rights Law
or
Human Rights Law (with Goldsmiths' Human Rights Clinic)
And a maximum of 30 credits from the list of Law and Society modules:
Prisons, Punishment and Society
Contemporary Issues in Criminology
Psychology and Law
Anthropology of Rights 1

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Assessment methods

You’ll be assessed by a variety of methods, depending on your module choices. These include coursework, examinations, reports, case notes, statutory interpretation, critiques of articles, and research projects such as the dissertation.

As well as these traditional assessment methods, you'll also have the option in your second and third years to take modules that are wholly assessed in more innovative ways, such as:

a portfolio of mooting contributions
client interviewing, persuasive argumentation, written advice and legal drafting
voluntary and prepared contributions in the classroom
taking part in a human rights clinic and other experiential learning activities

The Uni


Course location:

Goldsmiths, University of London

Department:

Law

TEF rating:
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