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UCEN Manchester

Software Development

UCAS Code: G590

Foundation Degree in Science - FdSc

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

64

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About this course


Course option

2.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Programming

The aim of the programme is to train and support professional computer programmers, web developers and software engineers. The course is fast-paced and heavily practical, encouraging students to combine theory and practice whilst not compromising on academic quality. The course is ideal for those who enjoy writing code, creating applications and have a wish to develop a logical approach to problem solving.

On completion of this course you will receive a Foundation degree in Software Development. You will then be able to complete a top-up year to study towards a BSc in Software Development.

Modules

Professional And Academic Development (30 credits)
This unit will support student transition to graduate level study and professional careers. It will focus on developing and re-enforcing critical, analytical, academic and linguistic skills and preparing Students vocationally by enhancing their knowledge and skills to inform existing or potential professional careers. The unit will support students in developing employability skills and aid them in developing their professionalism in relation to their subject area.

Linux Fundamentals with Administration (30 credits)
This unit provides a general introduction to Linux theory and practice, while also comparing open and closed source operating systems. Linux clients will be networked alongside a server and managed.

Fundamentals of Programming (30 credits)
This unit introduces fundamental concepts of computer programming. The unit includes the principles and practice of programming design, the implementation, and testing of programming solutions, and the concepts and principles of problem solving by computer.

Practice Based Research Project (30 credits)
The Unit aims to provide students with the opportunity to further explore discipline-specific knowledge and undertake a research project in a self-selected area of professional practice with the context of the Award studied.

Introduction to Web and Database Development (30 credits)
This unit introduces the fundamental principles, concepts and practices of databases, the internet and web development. The unit covers the development of websites that connect to databases along with associated technologies that allow database interactivity by the end user.
The content could include HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, SQL, web database connectivity, HCI design, storyboarding, graphics, data modelling, usability and web standards.

Object Orientated Programming (30 credits)
Object oriented programming is an industry-proven method for developing reliable modular programs and is popular in software engineering. Consistent use of object oriented techniques can lead to shorter development lifecycles, increased productivity and lower the cost of producing and maintaining systems.
Programming with objects simplifies the task of creating and maintaining complex applications. Object oriented programming is a way of modelling software that maps programming code to the real world.
The aim of the unit is to develop the key programming skills learnt in the Fundamentals of Programming unit. The unit includes the principles and practices of object-oriented design, implementation and testing of programming solutions.

Mobile Application Development (30 credits)
This unit introduces an industrial strength programming language (with supporting software technologies and standards) and object-oriented application development in the context of mobile application development for smartphones and tablets. The approach is strictly application driven. Students will learn the syntax and semantics of the chosen language and its supporting technologies and standards and object oriented design and coding techniques by analysing a sequence of carefully graded finished applications. Students will also design and build their own applications.

Database Driven Websites (30 credits)
This unit will develop the basic concepts of website authoring, from design to implementation. Students will develop skills in creating digital content, which is authorised to deal with the particular issues of web publishing.

Assessment methods

A range of assessment methods are used and could be in the form of the following:

• Reports
• Oral presentations
• Group work
• Practical assignments
• Time constrained tests
• Peer assessment
• Live industry briefs.

Each module is structure is broken down as follows:
• Summative Assessment 25%
• Directed Study 30%
• Student-centred Learning 45%

The Uni


Course location:

Openshaw Campus

Department:

CIT (BCCI)

TEF rating:
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What students say


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Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Programming

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£17k

£17k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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