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University of Plymouth

Computing, Audio and Music Technology

UCAS Code: J9I3

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


104-112 tariff points. General studies accepted.

Considered in combination

Pass a named Access to HE Diploma with at least 33 credits at Merit/Distinction.

Considered in combination

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

26-27

English and Maths accepted within as GCSE equivalent

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H3,H3,H3,H4,H4

English and Maths accepted within as GCSE equivalent

Considered in combination

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

D*D

In any subject

Considered in combination

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

In any subject

Considered in combination

104-112 tariff points.

In combination with Advanced Highers

UCAS Tariff

104-112

Considered in combination

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subjects

Audio technology

Programming

Technology drives the music industry and influences the way we consume, produce, and use audio. It enables us to create music on our laptop, have instant access to millions of songs via the internet, and communicate with our technology. The industry’s increasing reliance on technology is providing new jobs and changing what audio and music tech firms want from their employees. Today, employment in Audio and Music Technology spans far beyond recording studios and live concerts to the realms of software development, assistive technologies, gaming, and further. There is an increasing demand for music technologists who can use and maintain existing technologies and create new innovative tools that help shape the future of the industry. Graduates of this degree will be prepared for employment in the modern Audio and Music Technology sectors along with other domains in Computing and Engineering.

This degree is perfect for people who have a love for music and all things technology. No prior musical training or technical expertise is necessary to undertake this course, just enthusiasm and new ideas!

Here is just a snapshot of what to expect on this programme:

- Become an expert in recording, mixing, mastering, acoustics, digital audio workstations, audio processing, sound synthesis, and sampling whilst using the very latest technologies in the industry.

- Learn hands-on and liberating computer programming and signal processing techniques that will empower you to realise your own innovative ideas. No longer will your creativity be confined by pre-made software!

- Go beyond the recording studio to explore how music technologies can change and enrich lives. You will be introduced to areas such as Music Neurotechnology, Intelligent Creative Systems, Algorithmic Composition, Automated Mixing, and Computational Creativity. Discover how to apply your advanced knowledge to enable people with severe disabilities to interact with a computer or how to create intelligent assistive technologies for people living with dementia.

- Learn from academics who have written field-defining texts that are used to teach the topic throughout the world.

- Prepare for a career in either the technology or creative industries. Our curriculum aligns with Music Technology employers who are seeking candidates with knowledge of both computing for audio/music and contextual use of the systems the industry is developing.

- Mix and collaborate with musicians on the BA Music degree.

- Graduate with a diverse portfolio of practical work that evidences innovation in computing, music technology, and audio, which will provide a unique edge in a competitive job market.

This degree is taught out of the University of Plymouth’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR). This centre has been recognised as world-leading by the UK Government’s last assessment of research quality. The centre works on projects with industry partners such as the BBC R&D, Grey London, Rigetti Computing, Bauer Media, and CereProc.

Modules

• Year one provides students with a solid grounding in modern music technology. Learners will develop the fundamental technical skills required to work effectively and creatively with music and audio in the digital and acoustic domains. They will become familiar with the theory of sound and music, audio engineering applied to recording, mixing, and mastering, and computer programming. This curriculum is designed to provide students with the understanding and skills to use existing technologies while provoking curiosity around developing new digital tools for audio and music.

• In year two, students will transition from using existing audio and music technologies to learning how to develop and deploy their own. They will engage with industry briefs and work as technical experts with musicians on creative projects. Students will learn how to build their own digital instruments, how to make their own hardware and software interfaces, and about the latest research in Audio and Music Technology.

• Year three allows students to focus on individual interests. They will plan and develop a project that explores an area of their choosing in the realms of Computing, Audio, and Music Technology (e.g. a recording project or developing a new effect plugin). Alongside embarking on a substantial project, students will learn advanced skills in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and audio signal processing. Students will also explore how to deploy their skills in assistive music technology, creating devices that can change and enrich lives.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£14,200
per year
International
£14,200
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Plymouth

Department:

School of Humanities and Performing Arts

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Others in technology

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

71%
UK students
29%
International students
88%
Male students
12%
Female students
71%
2:1 or above
2%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
B
D

Computing

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

94%
UK students
6%
International students
92%
Male students
8%
Female students
69%
2:1 or above
19%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Materials and technology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£27,000
high
Average annual salary
94%
med
Employed or in further education
71%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

29%
Engineering professionals
13%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
13%
Other elementary services occupations

Computing

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£24,000
med
Average annual salary
93%
med
Employed or in further education
79%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

70%
Information technology and telecommunications professionals
8%
Information technology technicians
3%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals

A specialist subject, and not surprisingly graduates tend to go into software engineering roles or related. The degree classification students achieved made a particular difference last year — computing graduates with the best grades were much less likely to be out of work after six months and employers can even rate a good grade as important as work experience. Most students do get jobs, though, and starting salaries are good — particularly in London, where average starting salaries for good graduates were getting towards £38k last year. Be aware that at the moment, recruitment agencies are much the most common way for graduates from this degree to get their first job, so it may be worth getting in touch with a few specialist agencies in advance of graduation if you take this degree to get a foot in the door.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Computer science

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£23k

£23k

£26k

£26k

£28k

£28k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here