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Public Relations and Marketing Communications

Entry requirements


A level

B,C,C

English or Media Studies preferred. English required and Maths preferred at GCSE with grade C or 4.

Various Access Courses are accepted: Access to University Study Access to Community, Education & Humanities Access to Arts, Social Sciences & Primary Teaching Access to Languages, Arts and Social Sciences Access to Languages with Business Access to Humanities/Primary Education Access to Degree Studies Access to Arts & Social Science Access to Humanities Access to Social Sciences Access to Teaching

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

28

English or Media Studies are preferred. English required and Maths preferred.

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H2,H2,H3,H3

English or Media Studies are preferred. English required and Maths preferred at O4/H5.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MMM

Scottish HNC

Pass

Successful completion of your HNC in any subject with a C in the graded unit

Scottish HND

Pass

Successful completion of your HND in any subject with a CC in the graded units

Scottish Higher

B,B,B,B

English or Media Studies are preferred. English required and Maths preferred at National 5 at grade C.

UCAS Tariff

104-108

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subjects

Marketing

Public relations

This course will give you the theoretical understanding, professional experience and industry contacts you need to step into an exciting and rewarding career in public relations (PR) and marketing.

Public relations and marketing communications are fascinating, fast-moving fields that offer many rewarding career opportunities. Thanks to modern media and the voracious consumer appetite for digital content, they are constantly evolving and on this course you’ll enjoy frontline professional experience and tuition informed by cutting-edge scholarship.

This course gives you an unrivalled opportunity to study two closely aligned disciplines: public relations and marketing. Organisations often take an integrated approach to communication, bringing together these two disciplines to help drive success. PR manages relationships with a range of stakeholder groups including employees, the government and the media, while marketing focuses on relationships with the customer.

You’ll gain practical experience of developing strategic PR and marketing communication solutions for live clients, creating authentic digital content for a range of social media platforms. You’ll find out how organisations use video, photography, blogs and podcasts to drive their marketing, and how you can help them do it better. You’ll undertake original research to inform decision making, and measure the effectiveness of campaigns using a range of analytics. Students also gain a wealth of experience through a work placement as well as having the opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner institutions (subject to availability). You’ll be taught by internationally renowned academics who are still actively engaged with the industry. Industry practitioners will see you in action and many of our graduates have gone on to work with contacts that they made on the course.

In Year One key concepts in PR and marketing are covered and essential practical skills developed. Students look at the history of the industries and current practice, and debate the role the industries play in economics, politics and society. You also consider contemporary communications practice and the importance of producing dynamic and creative content including video, photography, blogs, infographics and social media posts that are relevant to target publics.

Year Two expands your knowledge and understanding of professional practices in PR and marketing. Students consider how organisations campaign on issues and communicate with external stakeholders through the media and internally with employees.

In Year Three, the principles of planning are expanded upon from the perspective of those who manage marketing and PR activities. Concepts of strategy and persuasion are introduced and research skills are strengthened. Students gain an insight into advertising and experiential marketing where the audience is immersed in an event such as a music festival and how this emotional response is used by organisations to build brand awareness, trust and loyalty. In Year Three students can start to tailor their learning around their interests through the selection of an option.

In Year Four, students are encouraged to work more independently, develop their critical skills and follow their own area of interest. This happens through working on your dissertation research project, working in industry on a one-month placement and choosing options from across the two disciplines.

Modules

Year One

Media Industries 1
Studying Media and Communications
Digital Content Creation
Media Production: Skills and Techniques
Media Production: Video Project
Introduction to Marketing

Year Two

Popular Media Cultures
Media Campaigning
Media Production:Online Journalism
Event Management
Analytics, Insights and Impact
Digital Business and e-Commerce

Year Three

Advertising and Marketing Communications
Campaigning and Practice
Experiential Marketing and Consumer Behaviour
Designing a Research Project
Persuasive Communication
plus two options

Year Four

Placement
Strategic Marketing Management
Dissertation
plus two options
Year Three and Four options may include:

International PR
Global Journalism
Photography and Visual Culture
Film Festivals
Communication Arts and Activism
Political Communication
Radio and Audio Media
Photography Practice
Pop Music
Screenwriting
Film and the Family

The modules listed here are correct at time of posting (April 2021) but may differ slightly to those offered in 2022. Please check back here for any updates.

Assessment methods

We use a mix of methods including lectures, seminars and practical workshops. As well as these face-to-face interactions, some modules are delivered online. Each module is supported by a virtual learning resource site. As well as lecture notes, seminar activities, key readings, assignment specifications and discussion forums, additional materials such as videos, radio edits and links to other resources can be uploaded to the site. The assessment strategy uses a range of methods to support your academic and professional development. These include: essays, reports, presentations, online discussions/postings, exams, reflective diaries, e-portfolios and content production for different media such as video, photography, website, blogs, posts and tweets.

Below you can read about Teaching and Learning Activities and Assessment Activities. We believe this will give you a good indication of what the course will be like, but the exact balance of activities may differ depending on the academic year and on the modules you choose.

Teaching and learning activities

Our Teaching and Learning Activities are focused on building your confidence, developing your problem-solving skills and preparing you for a successful career. Here you can read about how much time you should expect to spend undertaking these activities for this course along with a general description of the activity for all courses.

Teaching

You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and in some cases practical workshops or laboratories. Seminars enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

Year One: 14%
Year Two: 13%
Year Three: 16%
Year Four: 8%

Independent Learning

When not attending lectures, seminars, practicals or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the Learning Resource Centre, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. You independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities, including the Learning Resource Centre and the Hub.

• Year One: 86%
• Year Two: 87%
• Year Three: 84%
• Year Four: 79%

Placement

Courses with placements give you the opportunity to put what you are learning into practice and to observe and work with a wide range of individuals and groups of people in diverse settings. Some courses offer placement opportunities in the UK and overseas.

• Year One: 0%
• Year Two: 0%
• Year Three: 0%
• Year Four: 13%

Assessment Activities

Assessment Activities provide you with opportunities to test your understanding of the subject and receive feedback on your performance. Here you can read about how much of your final mark is based on each type of formal assessment for this course along with a general description of the activity for all courses.

Exams

Assessment by written examinations normally takes place at the end of each module or semester, but they may also happen during modules.

• Year One: 17%
• Year Two: 0%
• Year Three: 0%
• Year Four: 0%

Coursework

Coursework assessments take place in a variety of ways, including assignments, essays, reports, portfolios, project output and your level 4 Honours project. We aim to provide you with feedback on your assessment within 20 working days of the submission date.

• Year One: 52%
• Year Two: 90%
• Year Three: 88%
• Year Four: 100%

Practical

Practical assessments can include oral presentations, performance, practical skills assessment, costume design and construction, film making, lab work or clinical practical skills depending on the nature of the course.

• Year One: 32%
• Year Two: 10%
• Year Three: 12%
• Year Four: 0%

NB This data is based on activity undertaken by students during academic year 2018/9. Updates will be made shortly.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£7,000
per year
International
£7,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Republic of Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£1,820
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Queen Margaret University

Department:

School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

80%
high
Marketing
79%
med
Public relations

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Marketing

Teaching and learning

64%
Staff make the subject interesting
82%
Staff are good at explaining things
82%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
91%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

64%
Library resources
73%
IT resources
73%
Course specific equipment and facilities
55%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

60%
UK students
40%
International students
14%
Male students
86%
Female students
64%
2:1 or above
12%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
E

Publicity studies

Teaching and learning

73%
Staff make the subject interesting
80%
Staff are good at explaining things
80%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
83%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

55%
Library resources
81%
IT resources
74%
Course specific equipment and facilities
56%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

60%
UK students
40%
International students
18%
Male students
82%
Female students
70%
2:1 or above
9%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
E

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Business and management

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
low
Average annual salary
91%
low
Employed or in further education
57%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

25%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
11%
Managers and proprietors in other services
8%
Business, research and administrative professionals

Want to join a fast-moving, diverse industry that's at the cutting edge of tech? Try marketing! A lot of the jobs are in London, but graduates don't just go to work in advertising agencies — all sorts of industries do their own marketing these days, and with the rise of digital and mobile technology, a lot of marketing is done in quite innovative ways using a wide range of methods. Common industries (apart from advertising and PR) include recruitment, online retail, higher education, banking and IT. A lot of jobs in this industry are handled through recruitment agencies, so if you get in touch with them early, that might give you a headstart for some of the jobs available. But be careful — unpaid working is not the norm in the marketing industry, but it is more common than in most sectors.

Media, journalism and communications

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
42%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

17%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
10%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
10%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Business and management

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

£22k

£22k

£24k

£24k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Media, journalism and communications

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£16k

£16k

£20k

£20k

£21k

£21k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Lower entry requirements
Sheffield Hallam University
Marketing with Public Relations with Foundation Year
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
Edinburgh Napier University
Marketing with Digital Media
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Higher entry requirements
Bournemouth University
Marketing Communications with Public Relations
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh
Film and Media
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here