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Sheffield Hallam University

Law

UCAS Code: M100

Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)

Entry requirements


Access to HE Diploma

P:45

At least 45 credits at level 3 and 15 credits at level 2 from a relevant Open College Network accredited course

GCSE/National 4/National 5

English Language or English Literature at grade C or 4 Mathematics at grade C or 4

UCAS Tariff

120

This must include at least two A levels or equivalent BTEC National qualifications. For example: BBB at A Level. DDM in BTEC Extended Diploma. A combination of qualifications, which may include up to two AS Levels, EPQ and general studies.

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Other options

4.0 years | Sandwich | 2020

Subject

Law

**Course summary**
• Get real legal work experience in every year of your degree.
• Take work placements in legal settings across the UK and overseas.
• Gain a degree accredited by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.
• Study modules designed around the Solicitors Qualifying Examination.
• Work in our on-campus law firm alongside practising lawyers and specialist academics.
• Have the opportunity to work abroad — Erasmus funding is available for European placements.

On this course, you’ll gain the skills, experience, contacts and credentials you need to kick-start your legal career. You’ll do real legal work through our on-campus law firm while gaining a detailed legal education, designed around the Solicitors Qualifying Examination. When you graduate, you won’t only have an accredited law degree — you’ll have extensive legal work experience to support your qualification as a solicitor.
This course provides you with a solid base for a wide range of legal careers.

From your first year, you’ll gain a detailed induction into law, and begin working on real cases and projects in our on-campus law firm, SHU Law.
In your second year, you’ll begin to specialise — choosing an area such as criminal appeals, prisoners' rights, commercial litigation, personal injury or employment law to experience as part of SHU Law.
Your final year allows you to build on your experience, taking on more responsibility for your cases and working more closely with your clients. You will also have opportunities to branch out into placement settings across the UK and overseas, while cementing your knowledge not just as a student, but as a trainee lawyer.
Other final year opportunities include working within our Human Rights Clinic and working with children and young people through our Street Law module.

You learn through
• lectures, seminars and workshops
• practical module
• work placements in SHU Law and elsewhere
There are opportunities to study abroad at one of our partner universities with the possibility of funding through the Erasmus programme.

**Applied learning**
SHU Law
Our regulated and supervised on-campus law firm, SHU Law, offers law students a unique chance to get ahead with their solicitor qualifications. You’ll gain vital industry experience, working alongside solicitors on real cases.
Uniquely, your work with SHU Law is fully integrated into your course from your first year, and will continue throughout your studies.

**Work placements**
In your final year, you can choose to opt out of SHU Law work placements and enter an external legal setting.
Placements have been taken at major national and international law firms such as Irwin Mitchell and DLA Piper, and often involve sitting in on real hearings and court cases with solicitors. You may also choose to do a placement in areas such as local government, coroners’ offices or local law firms.
There are also international work placements available in the USA, including at the Public Defenders’ Office in Savannah, and Innocence Project in San Diego.
Your placement supervisor will help you find the right fit for your career, and will provide support throughout your experience.

**Social justice**
Throughout the course, you’ll help and advocate for those who don’t have or can’t afford representation. You’ll also work on our court helpdesks which provide vital legal advice, free of charge, to members of the public.

In your third year, you will have the opportunity to work in our Human Rights Clinic, which is part of the award-winning Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice. You’ll also have the chance to work with the charity Urban Lawyers through the Street Law module — where you will teach school children from disadvantaged areas about their rights, and how they can enter the legal profession.

Modules

The modules for 2020/21 may vary to those given below, which are for academic year 2019/20.

Year 1
Compulsory modules

Criminal Law And Practice 30 Credits
Dispute Resolution In Contract 30 Credits
Introduction To Law And Practice 30 Credits
Uk Constitutional Law And Practice 30 Credits

Year 2
Compulsory modules
Dispute Resolution In Tort 30 Credits
Land, Property Law And Practice 30 Credits
Legal Professional Practice Development 30 Credits
Trusts & Equitable Wrongs (Including Wills And Administration Of Estates) 30 Credits
Final year
Compulsory modules

Legal Professional Practice (Contentious) 30 Credits
Legal Professional Practice (Non-Contentious) 30 Credits
Elective modules

Commercial Law And Practice 30 Credits
Dissertation 30 Credits
Employment Law And Practice 30 Credits
Family Law, Policy And Practice 30 Credits
Immigration Law And Practice 30 Credits
International Human Rights 30 Credits
Law And Medicine 30 Credits
Law Of Business Organisations 30 Credits
Sports Law And Practice 30 Credits

Assessment methods

• Coursework
• Exams
• Practical assessments

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£13,650
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

Extra funding

Scholarships, discounts and bursaries may be available to students who study this course.

The Uni


Course location:

Sheffield Hallam University

Department:

Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

84%
high
Law

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

Teaching and learning

85%
Staff make the subject interesting
96%
Staff are good at explaining things
84%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
90%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

89%
Library resources
92%
IT resources
89%
Course specific equipment and facilities
88%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

99%
UK students
1%
International students
33%
Male students
67%
Female students
74%
2:1 or above
10%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,000
low
Average annual salary
94%
low
Employed or in further education
42%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

31%
Legal associate professionals
8%
Public services and other associate professionals
6%
Customer service occupations

Law graduates tend to go into the legal industry, and they usually take similar routes. Jobs are competitive — often very competitive - but starting salaries are good and high fliers can earn serious money - starting on over £24k in London on average. Be aware though - some careers, especially as barristers, can take a while to get into, and the industry is changing as the Internet, automation and economic change all have an effect, If you want to qualify to practise law, you need to take a professional qualification — many law graduates then go on to law school. If you want to go into work, then a lot of law graduates take trainee or paralegal roles and some do leave the law altogether, often for jobs in management, finance and the police force. A small proportion of law graduates also move into another field for further study. Management, accountancy and teaching are all popular for these career changers, so if you do take a law degree and decide it’s not for you, there are options.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here