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Clinical Pharmacology BSc

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

Biology or Chemistry plus one other subject. General Studies not accepted. Must also meet GCSE requirements as outlined on website.

Access to HE Diploma

D:27,M:18,P:0

Full Award Diploma in a science subject. 60 credits at level 3 (45 graded and 15 ungraded). 45 pure science related credits graded credits at Distinction and Merit. Overall 27 credits must be graded at distinction and 18 at merit. Pure sciences excludes Sociology. Must also meet GCSE requirements as outlined on website.

Cambridge International Pre-U Certificate - Principal

M2,M2,M2

Combinations of individual Pre-U subjects and A Levels are acceptable. Must also meet GCSE requirements as outlined on website.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

32

15 points at Higher Level, including a minimum grade 5 in Biology or Chemistry. At Standard Level, a minimum score of 5 must be attained in Maths and English, if at least a 6 (B) has not previously been attained in GCSE/IGCSE Maths and English. We accept both Mathematics: analysis & approaches and Mathematics: applications & interpretations.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

Applied Science. Must also meet GCSE requirements as outlined on website.

Scottish Advanced Higher

B,B

To include Chemistry or Biology, and supplemented by 3 Scottish Highers at BBB. Must also meet GCSE/National 5 requirements as outlined on website.

Scottish Higher

B,B,B

To include Chemistry or Biology, and supplemented by 2 Scottish Advanced Highers at BBB. Must also meet GCSE/National 5 requirements as outlined on website.

UCAS Tariff

81-120

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subject

Pharmacology

Clinical pharmacology is the science of designing and testing medicines for use in humans. Clinical pharmacologists work at the meeting point between the laboratory and clinic, developing discoveries into medicines. They also identify clinical problems that need investigation in research settings. Clinical pharmacologists are in high demand and have been described by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) as ‘one of four scientists that save the world every day’.

St George’s Clinical Pharmacology BSc is the only course of its kind in the UK, designed in collaboration with industry to prepare students for employment from the outset. The course takes a holistic view of the development of drugs, from understanding disease processes and identifying possible drug targets to organising testing, rolling out clinical trials, negotiating complex regulations and licensing and finally, treating patients and potentially saving lives. You’ll relate your learning to real life through case studies and practical activities, which in 2020 included students assisting with the running and management of COVID-19 testing of students across St George’s.

The curriculum is based around seven core modules which run alongside each other throughout the course, allowing you to understand topics from different perspectives and reinforce your learning. Every student spends six weeks on industry-related work experience in Year 2 and the course has excellent professional links with the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), regulatory bodies, contract research organisations and major pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical companies.

**Course highlights**

- The only undergraduate course in the UK dedicated to clinical pharmacology, designed in collaboration with industry.

- Taught by experienced practising clinicians and scientists, many of whom are involved with research and clinical trials associated with the fight against COVID-19.

- Deepen your knowledge of the human body and fundamentals of science through practical sessions in our anatomy and dissection rooms.

**About St George’s, University of London**

Established in 1752, St George’s is the UK’s specialist health university and is dedicated to medical and health sciences education, training and research. We share our site with a major London teaching hospital, which is both on the clinical frontline for a diverse local community and a centre of excellence for specialist conditions. At St George's, you’ll study in a clinical setting with like-minded individuals working across a variety of healthcare professions.

St George’s has enjoyed an outstanding track record of research and innovation in infectious disease ever since the ‘father of vaccinology’ and St George's alumnus, Edward Jenner, created the world’s first vaccine (against smallpox). Recent research has included a focus on tuberculosis, malaria, HIV in low and middle-income countries and COVID-19.

Modules

You can find extensive information about the modules you can expect to study on this course on our website: https://www.sgul.ac.uk/study/courses/clinical-pharmacology#modules

Assessment methods

You can find detailed information about assessment methods for this course on our website: https://www.sgul.ac.uk/study/courses/clinical-pharmacology#study

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£19,250
per year
International
£19,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

St George's, University Of London

Department:

Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education

Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Pharmacology

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

98%
UK students
2%
International students
26%
Male students
74%
Female students
85%
2:1 or above
11%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Subjects allied to medicine

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£23,000
high
Average annual salary
98%
med
Employed or in further education
76%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

29%
Health professionals
26%
Therapy professionals
9%
Health associate professionals

As only a relatively small number of students study pharmacology or toxicology, these statistics refer most closely to the graduate prospects of pharmacy graduates, so bear that in mind when you review them. Only a handful of students take first degrees in pure toxicology every year — the subject is more popular at Masters level. Pharmacology is a degree that tends to lead to jobs in the medical and pharmaceutical industries, and outcomes are improving again after a difficult time in the last few years. Jobs in pharmacology are often very specialist and so it’s no surprise that pharmacologists are amongst the most likely of all students to go on to a doctorate — if you want a job in research, start thinking about a PhD. As for pharmacy, unemployment rates are below 1% and 95% of pharmacy graduates had jobs as pharmacists (mostly in retail pharmacists) six months after they left their courses - employment rates have gone up significantly in the last couple of years.

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Lower entry requirements
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Nearby University
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Same University
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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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