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University Centre Peterborough

Electrical and Electronic Control Systems Engineering

UCAS Code: BECS

Bachelor of Engineering (with Honours) - BEng (Hon)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

64

64 UCAS points with at least one qualification in a related subject: •A-levels (in Mathematics and Physics) •BTEC Level 3 National Diploma •IB Diploma •Access to HE Students who have completed a level 4 or 5 qualification in Engineering (such as HNC/D or FdSc) may be entitled to module exemptions in either years 1 or 2. Students who do not qualify by any of these qualifications should call 01733 214466 or email [email protected] to discuss equivalent qualifications and previous experience. You must have GCSEs English, Mathematics and Science at grade C or above. We accept A level General Studies and AS levels when combined with other full qualifications. If English is not your first language you will require IELTS score of 6.0 or above or an equivalent English Language qualification. A face to face interview is required before an offer can be made.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

This course has been developed to meet the demands and skills shortages of the electrical and electronic control systems industry. The course integrates academic learning, essential practical skills, design, and management and prepares students for roles such as Research & Development Engineer, Senior Test Engineer, Automation Engineer, Product Design and Project Management.

Electrical and electronic engineers are concerned with making our products faster, cheaper, smaller and better. Electrical and electronic engineers are also involved in the ongoing development and production of a diverse range of products, and so companies supplying anything from bread to jet engines, from mobile phones to banking services will need their skills.

The first year covers core engineering principles and technologies such as mathematics, electrical engineering, electronics, mechanical engineering and programming. You will also spend time completing structured design projects.

In the second year there is greater emphasis on the application of the year 1 core principles through design in modules such as embedded systems, instrumentation and automation in industry. There will also be an opportunity to participate in a team engineering project taking a requirements to a conceptual design.

The final year enables students to investigate and critically evaluate different design methodologies in electrical and electronic control systems engineering and provides an opportunity to take part in research and development through the undergraduate major project.

The BEng (Hons) Electrical and Electronic Control Systems Engineering degree has been endorsed by regional engineering companies and also provides a foundation for a variety of postgraduate courses.

The courses at University Centre Peterborough are studied in smaller class sizes compared with other universities, a typical class size is under 30 students.

Modules

You must take modules worth 120 credits at each level of the course. Each module is worth a specified number of credits. Year one for full-time students (Level 4) •Introduction to Engineering Mathematics (15 credits) •Programming for Engineers (15 credits) •Digital and Analogue Electronics (15 credits) •Product Specification and Design (15 credits) •Further Engineering Mathematics (15 credits) •Electronic Circuit Design and Manufacture (15 credits) •Mechanical Principles 1 (15 credits) •Electrical Principles (15 credits) Year two for full-time students (Level 5) •Applied Engineering Mathematics (15 credits) •Business Management for Engineers (15 credits) •Embedded Systems Development (15 credits) •Instrumentation (15 credits) •Electrical Systems and Applications (15 credits) •Engineering Design Team Project (15 credits) •Automation in Industry (30 credits) Final year for full-time students (Level 6) •Undergraduate Major Project (30 credits) •Control Systems Engineering (15 credits) •Project Management for Engineers (15 credits) •Embedded Software Engineering (15 credits) •RF Systems and Circuit Design (15 credits) •Digital Signal Processing (15 credits) •Power Systems Engineering (15 credits) Click here for more information about each of the core modules. A typical 15 credit module is 150 hours includes 36 hours of tutor led delivery and 114 hours of recommended independent study. A typical 30 credit module is 300 hours includes 72 hours of tutor led delivery and 228 hours of recommended independent study. A full-time student should expect to undertake 38 additional hours per week during term-time. •For details of classification of awards please refer to page 91 of Academic Regulations. •For details of progression and module scenarios please refer to page 83 of Academic Regulations. •For details of compensation scenarios please refer to page 66 of Academic Regulations. •For details of assessment offences please refer to page 105 of Academic Regulations. •For details of how we will inform you of changes to modules please refer to page 2 of the terms and conditions.

Assessment methods

Throughout the duration of your course you will be assessed by the following methods: •Coursework •Reports •Portfolio •Reflective log book •Presentation/oral assessment •Written assessment •Written examination •Practical placement •Computer Aided Design •Virtual laboratory assessment •Measurement and testing laboratory •Multiple choice examination •Dissertation (final year) We will provide, by the beginning of the first week of each semester, a current module guide with all the information you need for each module, including details of assessment tasks, the deadlines for these tasks, the required format and any relevant guidance. A formative assessment workshop is written into all module plans and usually take place in weeks 9 or 10 of the semester. Each course includes a summative feedback session where marked work is returned. Your final degree classification is calculated as an average of your highest 60 credits at Level 5 and all credits at Level 6. 70%+ First 60-69% 2:1 50-59% 2:2 40-49% Third

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£8,000
per year
England
£8,000
per year
EU
£8,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£8,000
per year
Scotland
£8,000
per year
Wales
£8,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University Centre Peterborough

Department:

University Centre Peterborough Campus

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