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Astrophysics

Entry requirements


120 UCAS Points including A-Level B in Physics and Maths. Use of Maths and General Studies not accepted

122 UCAS points including 15 level 3 credits at Distinction in Maths, and 15 level 3 credits at Distinction in Physics

GCSE/National 4/National 5

5 GCSEs at Grade C/4 or above including Maths and English or equivalent. Equivalent qualifications are Functional Skills Level 2 in Maths and English or Level 3 Key Skills in Maths and Communication.

Pass IB Diploma including 120 UCAS points from Higher Level subjects, including HL5 in Physics and Maths

120 UCAS Points including Physics and Maths at H1

Considered with A-Level grade B Maths and Physics

Considered with A-Level grade B Maths and Physics

120 UCAS Points including Physics and Maths at grade B.

UCAS Tariff

120

including A-Level B in Physics and Maths.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subject

Astrophysics

**Course Overview**

- Did you ever wonder how stars and galaxies came to be? Astrophysics can provide the answer – with the skills, methods and knowledge to investigate the physics of our universe.

- Studying our Astrophysics BSc (Hons) programme offers the opportunity to explore the very fabric of our universe. You’ll develop skills in various scientific methods, while learning how physics applies to stellar objects and systems.

- With us, you’ll work in a state-of-the art learning environment for practical analysis, interpretation and modelling of astronomical data, developing a sophisticated practical and theoretical knowledge base. You’ll also get the chance to spend a year abroad, whether studying at a partner institution or working with an approved research project.

- By the time you graduate, you should leave us with well-developed excellent observational, mathematical and logical skills, coupled with keen problem-solving abilities. It’s the kind of mix that’s attractive to employers in a wide range of sectors – from medical physics and education to oil and gas.

**Why study with us**

- Learn at one of the UK’s best-equipped teaching observatories, with our recent £200,000 investment in probably the most powerful modern optical telescope available in the country.

- Bachelor of Science with Honours in Astrophysics is ranked 10th in the UK with 89% of students satisfied with the learning resources (National Student Survey 2020).

- This course is recognised by the Institute of Physics – you’ll qualify for student membership, and for Membership as a graduate.

Modules

Year 1: Compulsory modules; Introduction to Physics, Introduction to Laboratory Physics (including the “Physics Challenge”), Introduction to Astronomy, Introduction to Mechanics, Applied Physics and Linear Systems, Functions, Vectors, and Calculus.

Year 2: Compulsory modules, Electromagnetism and Waves, Thermal and Quantum Physics, Astrophysics II, Laboratory Physics and Astrophysics, Ordinary Differential Equations. Optional modules; Scientific Computing, Vector Calculus, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics.

Year 3: Compulsory modules; Formation, Structure, and Evolution of Stars, Relativity and Cosmology, Laboratory Physics and Astrophysics, Project. Optional modules; Electrodynamics and Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Condensed Matter (Solid State and Soft Matter), Fluid Dynamics, Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Central Lancashire

Department:

School of Natural Sciences

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

96%
high
Astrophysics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Astronomy

Teaching and learning

92%
Staff make the subject interesting
96%
Staff are good at explaining things
79%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
88%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

80%
Library resources
91%
IT resources
92%
Course specific equipment and facilities
83%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

90%
UK students
10%
International students
76%
Male students
24%
Female students
43%
2:1 or above
24%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
B
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Physical sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£19,200
med
Average annual salary
76%
low
Employed or in further education
42%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

16%
Science, engineering and production technicians
11%
Protective service occupations
11%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers

Not a lot of people study astronomy as a first degree, and if you want to be one of the small number of people who start work as an astronomer - often overseas - every year, you will need a doctorate — so at least a third of graduates go into further study. Astronomy graduates, however, are versatile, going into all parts of the jobs market - their good technical, data and maths skills taking them into IT and business especially. However, if you want to find out more specifically about the prospects for your chosen subject, it might be a good idea to go on open days and talk to tutors about what previous graduates from your chosen subject went on to do.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
University of Hertfordshire
Astrophysics with Space Science
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Lower entry requirements
University of Central Lancashire
Physics with Astrophysics (Foundation Entry)
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
Lancaster University
Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
University of Central Lancashire
Physics with Astrophysics
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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