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University of Kent

Cultural Studies and Media

UCAS Code: V902

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

The University will not necessarily make conditional offers to all Access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If we make you an offer, you will need to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

34

Applicants should have either an overall grade of 34 or 15 points at higher level.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

Distinction, Distinction, Merit in Health and Social Care or Public Services. Applicants should also have five GCSEs at grade C or above.

Scottish Higher qualifications are considered on an individual basis.

UCAS Tariff

120

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Media, journalism and communications

Cultural Studies and Media analyses the effect and impact of different digital and traditional media, from podcasts to billboard advertising and social media. This helps us to interpret phenomena like subcultures, fashion styles and leisure practices and to make sense of how we experience and organise our lives and govern our societies. At Kent, Cultural Studies and Media is taught in the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research where you benefit from a large choice of specialist modules on race, social change, criminal justice or disability and the arts. You are taught by leading academics in fields like gender, race and the body and have the opportunity to choose modules from a wide range of subject areas. You critically explore the links between culture, media and society drawing on critical theories and methods from the Social Sciences and the Humanities. We examine a range of areas, from digital media, to the creative and cultural industries, to social identities and movements.

The programme begins with an overview of different cultural and sociological theories that address ‘culture’, ‘media’ and ‘society’ as part of a broader global and historical context. You then go on to learn how to conduct and apply qualitative sociological research that engages with mass media and advertising; digital media technologies; news and journalism; television and film; to name a few. During all stages of your studies you have the opportunity to choose specialist modules that suit your interest. Our modules and creative forms of assessment are designed to stimulate your thinking and prepare you for a job market looking for versatile and innovative individuals. In your final year of study, there is an option to take a dissertation module on a subject of your choice, which allows you to focus in detail on an area you are particularly passionate about.

We offer a Year Abroad option which takes place between the second year (stage 2) and final year (Stage 3) of your degree. You can apply to add a year abroad to your degree programme from your arrival at Kent until the autumn term of your second year but certain conditions have to be met during your studies before you can change to the year abroad.

Cultural Studies is also available as a joint honours degree with Criminology (UCAS code MV99 at institution K24).

The Uni


Course location:

University of Kent

Department:

School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research

TEF rating:
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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media, journalism and communications

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

64%
UK students
36%
International students
45%
Male students
55%
Female students
86%
2:1 or above
0%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media, journalism and communications

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

100%
high
Employed or in further education

Top job areas of graduates

42%
Media professionals
18%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
9%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers

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We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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