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Law with Criminology

Entry requirements


A level

A,A,B

Access to HE Diploma

D:30,M:15

Pass relevant diploma with 45 credits at Level 3.

Cambridge International Pre-U Certificate - Principal

D3,D3,M2

This qualification is only acceptable when combined with other qualifications

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

33

Plus grade 4 in Standard Level English required if not held at GCSE.

Qualification accepted. Please contact the Admissions Team for further information: [email protected]

OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma

D*D*D

Must have a strong GCSE background.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

D*D*D

Must have a strong GCSE background.

Scottish Advanced Higher

A,A,B

Qualification accepted. Please contact the Admissions Team for further information: [email protected]

This qualification is only acceptable when combined with other qualifications

UCAS Tariff

136-160

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subjects

Law

Criminology

Law and criminology are inextricably linked. This degree gives you a solid grounding in law, as well as an understanding of criminology: the basis for criminalising behaviour, penal theory, the nature of crime, its causes, prevention, and management. This is a joint honours course in which more than half of your modules are in the foundation subjects of law, plus some law options, with criminology modules accounting for the remainder.

Our degree prepares you for a variety of careers in criminal justice, whether as a legal professional or public servant focused on criminal justice or supporting prosecution, defence, rehabilitation or law and penal reform. You’ll benefit from dual perspectives; working with experts in both legal and criminology disciplines.

You will develop skills in legal and academic reasoning and research, and an appreciation of social policy and the principles of justice, underlying the fundamental principles of law and the criminal justice system. You will study modules from both Leicester Law School and the School of Criminology which examine the nature, extent, causes, and control of criminal behaviour in both the individual and wider society in addition to the essential foundations required for an LLB degree. You will also explore the factors that underscore processes of law-making, law-breaking and law enforcement. Leicester is ranked #2 in the country for teaching criminology (The Guardian University Guide 2021), and you'll benefit from our expertise at every step.

You can broaden your perspective with a year studying overseas, or make a difference by giving free legal advice to real clients through our Pro-Bono group. We will also encourage you to build practical skills through our award-winning extracurricular activities.

Law and Criminology are inseparable. Each discipline informs the other - changes in law inevitably lead to criminologists adapting their understanding, and vice versa. This course is ideal if you are interested in criminal law and want to broaden your knowledge to include what goes on outside the courtroom, in prison and working on offender behaviour.

Topics that are typically explored in criminology include:

What is the nature of criminal behaviour?
Why do individuals commit crime?
How and why do definitions of crime change over time and between societies?
How should society deal with criminal activity?

By combining the study of Law with Criminology you can complement and contextualise your Law studies for a broader and deeper understanding of your subject. Optional modules in law and criminology allow you to examine criminology issues in more detail, develop higher level legal skills or diversify to explore contrasting or complementary areas of law.

Modules

For more information on this course and a full list of modules, visit the course information page on our website

Assessment methods

For more information on the methods of assessment on this course, visit the course information page on our website

The Uni


Course location:

University of Leicester

Department:

Leicester Law School

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

83%
med
Law
90%
high
Criminology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

Teaching and learning

76%
Staff make the subject interesting
88%
Staff are good at explaining things
79%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
78%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

82%
Library resources
88%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
68%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

58%
UK students
42%
International students
33%
Male students
67%
Female students
90%
2:1 or above
3%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

Sociology

Teaching and learning

87%
Staff make the subject interesting
93%
Staff are good at explaining things
88%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
82%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

88%
Library resources
94%
IT resources
88%
Course specific equipment and facilities
79%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

90%
UK students
10%
International students
22%
Male students
78%
Female students
94%
2:1 or above
10%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
med
Average annual salary
95%
med
Employed or in further education
61%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

27%
Legal associate professionals
10%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
9%
Other elementary services occupations

Law graduates tend to go into the legal industry, and they usually take similar routes. Jobs are competitive — often very competitive - but starting salaries are good and high fliers can earn serious money - starting on over £24k in London on average. Be aware though - some careers, especially as barristers, can take a while to get into, and the industry is changing as the Internet, automation and economic change all have an effect, If you want to qualify to practise law, you need to take a professional qualification — many law graduates then go on to law school. If you want to go into work, then a lot of law graduates take trainee or paralegal roles and some do leave the law altogether, often for jobs in management, finance and the police force. A small proportion of law graduates also move into another field for further study. Management, accountancy and teaching are all popular for these career changers, so if you do take a law degree and decide it’s not for you, there are options.

Sociology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,500
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
28%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Other elementary services occupations
9%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
9%
Protective service occupations

We have quite a lot of sociology graduates, although numbers fell last year. But graduates still do pretty well. Most sociology graduates go straight into work when they complete their degrees, and a lot of graduates go into jobs in social professions such as recruitment, education, community and youth work, and housing. An important option for a sociology graduate is social work - and we're short of people willing to take this challenging but rewarding career. Sociology is a flexible degree and you can find graduates from the subject in pretty much every reasonable job — obviously, you don't find many doctors or engineers, but you do find them in finance, the media, healthcare, marketing and even IT. Sociology graduates taking further study often branch out into other qualifications, like teaching, law, psychology, HR and even maths, so don’t think a sociology degree restricts you to just one set of options.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Law

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£20k

£20k

£24k

£24k

£33k

£33k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Sociology, social policy and anthropology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

£22k

£22k

£26k

£26k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Lower entry requirements
Sheffield Hallam University
Law with Criminology with Foundation Year
Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
Birmingham City University
Law with Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
University of Leicester
Law with Politics
Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Higher entry requirements
University of Liverpool
Law with Criminology
Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here