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University of Liverpool

Medicine

UCAS Code: A100

Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery - MB ChB

Entry requirements


A level

A,A,A-A*,A,B

Evidence of excellent attainment in general and advanced secondary education: A levels taken in one sitting after a 2 year period of study, AAA, to include Chemistry together with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics and a third academic subject. The Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Skills Challenge Certificate is accepted in lieu of a third academic subject. Alternatively, A*AB also accepted but the A* A grades must include Chemistry together with either Biology, Physics or Maths; and a B grade required in the third academic subject. The Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Skills Challenge Certificate is accepted in lieu of a third academic subject. Applicants with a minimum of 12 points at GCSE may be considered if, at the time of application, they have achieved AAA or A*AB (as defined above). GCSEs in nine subjects attained by the end of Year 11 which must include: English Language, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Core & Additional Science is an acceptable alternative to the three individual sciences. Minimum of grade B (score 6) required in core subjects. A minimum score of 15 points from the best 9 GCSEs or equivalents. Points awarded as GCSE (A*/8/9) 3 points, GCSE (A/7) 2 points, GCSE (B/6) 1 point and BTEC (Non-Science) Level 2 and OCR awards (Distinction*/Distinction/Merit) 3/2/1 points. Three points is the maximum score awarded in each subject area. (e.g. Only one of Maths and Further Maths). Three points is the maximum score awarded for Dual Award GCSEs except for Dual Science for which up to 6 points may be awarded. Triple science can achieve a maximum of 9 points. Short course GCSEs will at most receive half the points of a full GCSE but two short courses can be offered in place of a full GCSE. No more than two Level 2 BTEC qualifications or OCR awards will be considered as part of the 9 GCSEs/equivalents. These cannot be used as replacements for English Language, Maths and Science subjects. i.e. a minimum of 7 full GCSEs required. The selection procedure at Liverpool is a competitive process. The indicative criteria are the minimum required. Invitation to interview is highly competitive and dependant on ranking of academic achievement and UCAT performance. Non-academic attributes will be assessed at interview and offers will be made to the most competitive applicants. No candidate will be made an offer without interview. The threshold for progressing through each stage of the process varies annually depending upon the quality and quantity of applications. The Medical School reserves the right to vary offer conditions depending on a candidate’s application. For applicants from England: Where a science has been taken at A level (Chemistry, Biology or Physics), a pass in the Science practical of each subject will be required. Applicants must complete the UCAT by the appropriate closing date for year of entry.

Specified Access to Medicine courses acceptable (see our Admissions page for more information).

Cambridge International Pre-U Certificate - Principal

D3,D3,D3-D2,D3,M1

• Diploma must offer three Principal Subjects completed within 2 years. Either: - D3, D3, D3 including Chemistry with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics and a third academic subject. - D2, D3, M1 but the D2, D3 must include Chemistry with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics, and M1 in third academic subject. • Up to two A-levels may be substituted for principal subjects (D2 = A*, D3 = A and M1 = B).

GCSE/National 4/National 5

Applicants with a minimum of 12 points at GCSE may be considered if, at the time of application, they have achieved AAA or A*AB (as defined above). GCSEs in nine subjects attained by the end of Year 11 which must include: English Language, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Core & Additional Science is an acceptable alternative to the three individual sciences. Minimum of grade B (score 6) required in core subjects. A minimum score of 15 points from the best 9 GCSEs or equivalents. Points awarded as GCSE (A*/8/9) 3 points, GCSE (A/7) 2 points, GCSE (B/6) 1 point and BTEC (Non-Science) Level 2 and OCR awards (Distinction*/Distinction/Merit) 3/2/1 points. Three points is the maximum score awarded in each subject area. (e.g. Only one of Maths and Further Maths). Three points is the maximum score awarded for Dual Award GCSEs except for Dual Science for which up to 6 points may be awarded. Triple science can achieve a maximum of 9 points. Short course GCSEs will at most receive half the points of a full GCSE but two short courses can be offered in place of a full GCSE. No more than two Level 2 BTEC qualifications or OCR awards will be considered as part of the 9 GCSEs/equivalents. These cannot be used as replacements for English Language, Maths and Science subjects. i.e. a minimum of 7 full GCSEs required.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

36

36 points overall (at first sitting). At Higher level, either: - 6,6,6 to include Chemistry with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics and a third academic subject. - 7,6,5 but the 7 and 6 grades must include Chemistry with either Biology, Physics or Mathematics in any order and 5 in a third academic subject. • In addition, 5,5,5 at Standard level (in subjects not offered at Higher level).

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H1,H1,H2,H2,H2,H2

• Six Higher level subjects must be offered at a single sitting. • Grades of H1 in two subjects to include Chemistry and either Biology, Maths or Physics. • Grades of H2 in four further academic subjects. • Subjects offered must include English Language, Biology, Maths or Physics if these subjects are not offered at GCSE equivalent (at a minimum of grade B/6).

Not acceptable in lieu of A levels

Scottish Higher

A,A,A,A,B

Please note that the qualifications awarded in 2020 will be considered equivalent to Highers/Advanced Highers) • AA in Advanced Highers in Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics and Maths. • AAAAB in Highers taken at one sitting after 1 year of study comprising Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics and Maths. • Minimum of National 5 in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English Language, Mathematics, and at least two others attained by the end of S4. • The Scottish Science Baccalaureate is not in itself sufficient to meet the required academic criteria.

UCAS Tariff

144-159

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About this course


Course option

5.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Pre-clinical medicine

University of Liverpool has opted into the TEF and received a Silver award.
The University of Liverpool School of Medicine aspires to create capable, confident and caring doctors equipped to practice in a 21st Century Healthcare Environment.
The MBChB Programme aims to graduate the doctors ready to deliver outstanding patient care in the current and future healthcare system, by developing students who are able to apply a compassionate, evidence-based and patient centred approach to their clinical practice. The programme is underpinned by a vision to harness expertise, from across the University and further afield, in developing our students’ understanding of the potential for 21st century medical practice.
The educational aims of the MBChB are to:
To ensure graduates are able to demonstrate the necessary knowledge, skills and professional behaviours to safely and ethically practice medicine.
1. To ensure graduates are able to meet the core requirements set out by the General Medical Council in “Outcomes for Graduates”.
2. To enable graduates to become lifelong learners committed to their own professional development.
The MBChB programme is a 5 year, full time, non-modular programme. The curriculum is organised and delivered through a number of supra-themes, under which fall a number of defined themes:

**MBChB Curriculum Supra-Themes and Themes**

Supra-Theme : Science and Scholarship:
Themes: Science of Medicine, Research and Scholarship, Design and Technology, Personalised Medicine and Genetics; The Good Doctor; Psychology and Sociology as Applied to Medicine (PSM); The Clinical Team; Professionalism, ethics and legal context; Public, Preventative and Global Health

Supra-Theme : Core Skills
Themes: Clinical Examination and procedural skills (new theme in name); Communication for Clinical Practice (CCP); Therapeutics and prescribing; Patient in Secondary Care Acutely Ill Patient; Preparation for Practice

Supra-Theme: Patient in the Community Setting
Theme: Patient Care Pathways; Disability and Community Care; General Practice

The curriculum is delivered under a spiral model, under which concepts are introduced at an appropriate level, and revisited with increasing levels of complexity as the course progresses. The structure of the programme can thus be broadly understood as follows:
MBChB Programme Structure
Year 1 Core clinical science: the structure and function of the human body under ‘normal’ conditions
Year 2 Pathology and disease: ‘abnormality and illness’ and the interaction with the environment
Year 3 Becoming a practitioner: Core clinical practice
Year 4 Broadening expertise: Specialist and challenging clinical practice
Year 5 Preparing for practice: Emergency and acute clinical medicine

In years one and two, all students follow the same lecture timetable, and are allocated to smaller groups for workshops, seminars and practical skill (clinical skills and anatomy) sessions. All teaching in Year 1 takes place on the University of Liverpool campus.
Throughout years 2-5 students undertake clinical placements. Local NHS Trusts, GP practices, hospices, specialist services and community services deliver the placement components of the programme. During the course of their studies, students will be expected to rotate through the different clinical providers for variable lengths of time, dependent upon placement block requirements. Secondary care providers are as follows: Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Aintree Hospital, Arrowe Park Hospital, Blackpool Hospital, Countess of Chester Hospital, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool Women’s Hospital, Royal Liverpool Hospital, Southport & Ormskirk Hospital, Warrington Hospital, Whiston Hospital, The Walton Centre.

The programme is accredited by the General Medical Council (GMC).

This programme is available with a Year in China. Please see further information under qualifications for details

The Uni


Course location:

University of Liverpool

Department:

School of Medicine

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

68%
low
Pre-clinical medicine

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Medicine (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

76%
Staff make the subject interesting
74%
Staff are good at explaining things
72%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
93%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

75%
Library resources
91%
IT resources
85%
Course specific equipment and facilities
46%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
42%
Male students
58%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A
A
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Pre-clinical medicine

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£26,614
low
Average annual salary
100%
med
Employed or in further education
100%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

100%
Health professionals

Medical degrees are some of the most difficult courses to enter, but very nearly all graduates go on to good, well-paid and secure careers in health. If you're taking a shorter pre-clinical course, you'll need to continue on to further medical training to complete an accredited qualification, which explains why a high proportion of those grads are 'in further study' six months later. And at the moment, the UK is short of doctors and we have upped the number of places available, so demand remains high.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Pre-clinical medicine

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£37k

£37k

£44k

£44k

£49k

£49k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here