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University of West London

Public Services with Foundation

UCAS Code: L232

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

D,D,D

Pass Access to HE Diploma (Minimum of 45 credits at level 3)

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MMP

UCAS Tariff

72

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Public services

Pursue your passion for civic duty and try and change the world or understand the challenges with this all-encompassing course. You will gain an understanding of the work of public service bodies, policy creation, implementation and evaluation, and issues around the management and governance of public services. You will also have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules at Levels 5 and 6, such as Public Service Law or Disaster and Emergency Management. This BA(Hons) Public Services course also equips you with the professional knowledge and transferable skills to go on to a range of careers in a growing and dynamic sector.

You will be part of the vibrant School of Law and Criminology, with active student societies, and annual trips to the University of North Texas, College of Du Page near Chicago, as well as regular external speaker and careers events.

Launch a rewarding career in the public service sector, a dynamic and growing area of study with plenty of graduate opportunities. Build on your knowledge of public service bodies including local and central government, as well as international and global public services. You will learn about policies from conception to execution and learn how to handle management issues and public service governance. Career-focused events and modules will enable you to develop and reflect upon your own employability and management skills.

These skills include:

Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies; these skills will help identify social trends and patterns and produce social statistics such as those used in market research, opinion polling, sales and other areas of employment
You will be able to look beyond a superficial evaluation of issues focusing instead on ‘why’ through social theories and writing. This type of enquiry promotes relevant critical skills which are considered invaluable by market researchers, policy analysts, government agencies, charities and other agencies interested in resolving multifaceted social problems.
Recognising the importance of working with different demographics you will gain an understanding of social differences and the challenges of facing different sections of society, as well as how those working within public services can respond to these challenges.
Your professional knowledge and transferable skills learned on this course will take you further in an evolving global landscape.

You will benefit from the excellent teaching and learning facilities at UWL including a state-of-the-art library, recorded lectures available to listen to on our UWLReplay system, and experienced staff who are active in research as well as experienced in professional practice.

This course includes a foundation year.

The Uni


Course location:

Main site - West London

Department:

School of Human and Social Sciences

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

70%
UK students
30%
International students
61%
Male students
39%
Female students
62%
2:1 or above
13%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,000
med
Average annual salary
96%
med
Employed or in further education
60%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

31%
Welfare professionals
9%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
7%
Protective service occupations

The numbers of people taking politics degrees fell sharply last year and we'll keep an eye on this one - it can't really be because of graduates getting poor outcomes as politics grads do about as well as graduates on average. Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Jobs in local and central government are also important. Other popular jobs include marketing and PR, youth and community work, finance roles, HR and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Because so many graduates get jobs in the civil service, a lot of graduates find themselves in London after graduating. Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in five politics graduates go on to take another course - usually a one-year Masters - after they finish their degrees.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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