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Wrexham University

UCAS Code: 758D | Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements

Sorry, no information to show

About this course

Course option

4years

Full-time | 2024

Subject

Equine studies

Why choose this course?

The relationship between horse and human is increasingly seen as central to the equestrian industry’s development – and this degree is one of a very select number in the UK that focuses on this.

Based at our rural Northop Campus with practical content primarily delivered at Clwydian Stud, Overton-on-Dee, the degree builds on the university’s strong record of teaching in behavioural and equine science.

Students will:

- *study in a subject area rated 1st in the UK for student satisfaction in the Agriculture & Forestry subject league tables, Complete University Guide 2022

- be prepared for further study with a foundation year shared with other animal science students

- benefit from partnerships with local businesses to help you develop industry-relevant skills and experience

- enjoy guest speakers and educational visits throughout the course

- get free training for British Horse Society examinations alongside the degree, together with £100 towards an equine vocational examination of choice

You can also choose to study this course without a foundation year BSc (Hons) Equine Science and Welfare Management UCAS code: D422

Key course features:
- Free training alongside your degree and £100 towards the cost of British Horse Society qualifications

- Apply new and existing scientific principles to the management and training of horses, whilst embracing equine welfare

- Study at our rural Northop campus in the beautiful North Wales countryside, with practical learning at Clwydian Stud, Overton, both providing access to excellent equestrian facilities, as well as making use of the amenities at the Wrexham campus

- Get ahead in the job market by gaining industry experience from work placements, educational visits and guest speakers

- *This subject area has been rated 1st in the UK for student satisfaction in the Agriculture & Forestry subject league tables, Complete University Guide 2022

Modules

What you will study

YEAR 1 (FOUNDATION YEAR)
Students on the Foundation Year of the Equine Science and Welfare Management degree will follow Bioscience modules designed to provide broad-based underpinning knowledge, experience and understanding of scientific methods and laboratory processes to support degree-level study. The Foundation year is taught at our Wrexham campus, with Level 4 (year 2) studies moving to our Northop campus.

MODULES

Introduction to biosciences
Laboratory and Field Skills in Biology (Biosciences)
Introduction to Experimental Design and Mathematical Analysis (Biosciences)
Introduction to Science
The skills you need
Contextual Studies

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 4)
During level 4 students will combine theory and practice. They will investigate equine behaviour and how horses learn. They will question the ethics of our industry and gain the practical skills necessary for their future career. Students will complete a work placement, and even at the start of their academic journey will be asked to focus on their career path.

MODULES

Biological Concepts
Stable Management (1)
Professional Practice
Academic and Personal Development
Ethics and Welfare
Equine Behaviour and Cognition

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 5)
Level 5 provides students with the opportunity to build on earlier topics and to put learning into practice. The effects of management and training on the horse are investigated by studying anatomy, physiology and fitness. The equine diet is explored and equine learning is investigated. Academic skills are developed this year by starting the research process.

MODULES

Anatomy and Physiology
Learning and Training
Stable Management (2)
Nutrition and Feeding Practice
Research Methodologies
Equine Health and Fitness

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)
The final year provides students with the opportunity to complete their own unique piece of research, enabling them to focus on a topic of choice. Equine reproduction and young stock management are concentrated on, together with methods of behaviour modification. Career development is also a central theme, and students are expected to complete additional professional development activities alongside their degree to enhance their chances of employment.

MODULES

Equine Reproduction and Young-stock Management
Applied Research Skills and Professional Development
Research Project
Animal Behaviour Modification
Stress and Animal Welfare

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment methods

Teaching & Assessment

Module delivery is achieved through a combination of theoretical lectures, seminar discussions, guest lectures, educational visits, and practical work. Between lectures students are expected to read around their subjects making use of the detailed reading lists published in Module Guides. Each module is assessed in a variety of ways.

Assessment includes academic essays, research posters, presentations, seminar discussions and practical assessment. The balance between the different forms of assessment is determined by the different aims and learning outcomes of the modules.

TEACHING AND LEARNING

Wrexham Glyndŵr University is committed to supporting our students to maximise their academic potential.

We offer workshops and support sessions in areas such as academic writing, effective note-making and preparing for assignments. Students can book appointments with academic skills tutors dedicated to helping deal with the practicalities of university work. Our student support section has more information on the help available.

In terms of particular needs, the University’s Inclusion Services can provide appropriate guidance and support should any students require reasonable adjustments to be made because of a recognised prevailing disability, medical condition, or specific learning difference.

The Uni

Course locations:

Wrexham

Wrexham (Main Campus)

Department:

School of Social and Life Sciences

Read full university profile

What students say

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Animal science

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

100%
UK students
0%
International students
17%
Male students
83%
Female students
21%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
A
C

After graduation

The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Animal science

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education

Top job areas of graduates

31%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
19%
Animal care and control services
15%
Other elementary services occupations

These stats refer to the prospects for graduates from both general animal studies courses and those for particular animals (such as equine science). Graduates don't generally get jobs as vets when they graduate; much the most common jobs tend to be roles caring for animals, such as veterinary nurses. Some of these jobs are not currently classified as professional level occupations, but in reality, you need a degree to get these jobs (and probably always have done), and graduates in them report that they got the jobs that they wanted. So the stats you see might not completely represent just how useful these degrees are for getting into animal care careers.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Animal science

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£19k

£19k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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