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Goldsmiths, University of London

Curating

UCAS Code: P130

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

Access to HE Diploma

D:30

Pass with 45 Level 3 credits including 30 Distinctions and a number of merits/passes in subject specific modules

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

33

With three Higher Level subjects at 655

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H2,H2,H2,H2

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

Scottish Advanced Higher

B,B,C

Scottish Higher

B,B,B,B,C

UCAS Tariff

120-136

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Curatorial studies

Do you want to advance your knowledge of contemporary art and pursue a professional career in the field of curatorial practice?

Curating refers to a wide range of activities including the care of collections and the development of exhibitions, festivals, screenings, digital platforms and more. Curators engage with historical knowledge and respond to urgent social issues, staging culture as a way of bringing together multiple publics.

Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths has been at the forefront of curatorial research for well over a decade, helping to redefine the profession. Drawing from this research, taught by leading curators and researchers, BA Curating combines a strong grounding in art history and contemporary cultural theory with the development of practical know-how and industry experience.

Alongside compulsory modules on the history, theory and practice of curating, you will be able to choose additional modules in art history, fashion, technology and performance, allowing you to focus your interests and get the most out of your degree. You will gain a good understanding of both the history of art and the history of exhibitions, learning how curatorial work shapes our understanding of visual culture.

The course will support you in developing a wide set of curatorial skills. Over three years you will work on a variety of assignments closely mentored by course staff and practising curators. This will allow you to become a more critical thinker and confident researcher, able to shape your curatorial projects successfully and communicate your work to a wide variety of audiences.

Students become familiar with the dynamics of different professional settings, from large museums to volunteer-run organisations and digital spaces through both visits and on-site project experience. A core component of the course is a placement within an arts organisation during the second year. In the past, students have worked with The Wellcome Collection, the Sir John Soane’s Museum, Cubitt, The Women’s Art Library, Bethlem Gallery, The Showroom, Gasworks, Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Queens Museum (NY) and?charities such as Single Housing Project. In their third year, students collaborate to organise a public exhibition with partner institutions, which further develops their skills in planning, programming and publicising exhibitions and events.

Fostering collaboration and peer support is a crucial aspect of the course. BA Curating students benefit from their own dedicated room, which they can use to stage work-in-progress, organise events and socialise around their course commitments. They are encouraged to initiate their own projects or join some of the existing ones, like The Art Columnist journal. They can also enjoy a rich programme of public events within the Visual Cultures department and the wider Goldsmiths community as well as the world-class exhibitions at the newly opened Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art.

**Why study BA Curating at Goldsmiths?**
Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths is internationally renowned for its research on Curatorial Practice and you will be learning from leading theorists and practitioners.
You will study?compulsory modules on curatorial history, theory and practice alongside option modules in art history and visual culture that allow you to focus on your particular interests.
You will be mentored to develop the know-how and practical skills necessary to practice as a contemporary art curator through a number of practical assignments as well as an industry placement in your second year.
You will develop your ability to work collaboratively and will work with your peers in your third year towards your degree show.
You will be supported to develop student-led projects and will have access to our dedicated Curating Room to host your events.
You will benefit from the rich programme of events at Goldsmiths as well from world-class exhibitions at the newly opened Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art.

Modules

Year 1- You take the following compulsory modules and one option module:
Modernities
Curating and the Public Sphere
Artefacts and Histories

Year 2 - In your second year, you will study the following core modules and four option modules from the Department of Visual Cultures:
Museums, Galleries, Exhibitions: Unpacking the Field I
Museums, Galleries, Exhibitions: Unpacking the Field II
Curating, Education and Research

In Year 3 you will complete a dissertation and study the following compulsory module along with two special subject options:
Curating the Contemporary.

The range of option modules include:
The Truth in Painting
Sexual Poetics
Philosophy and...
Film Fables
Archive and Spectacle
Animating Architecture
Patterns of Perception: Part 1
Ornamentation
Fashion as a Dialectical Image
Fact of Blackness I: Subjects of Difference
Beckett & Aesthetics: Bodies and Identity
Counter Forensics
Research Architecture
Visual Cultures as Public practice

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Assessment methods

You’ll be assessed mostly through coursework. Normally this consists of essays, sometimes accompanied by creative projects, group projects, multi-media projects, presentations, symposia, reviews, and studio work.

The Uni


Course location:

Goldsmiths, University of London

Department:

Visual Cultures

TEF rating:
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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media, journalism and communications

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

62%
UK students
38%
International students
25%
Male students
75%
Female students
89%
2:1 or above
16%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media, journalism and communications

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
high
Average annual salary
89%
low
Employed or in further education
47%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

25%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
15%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
11%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Mass communications & documentation

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£22k

£22k

£27k

£27k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

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It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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