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Plymouth Marjon University

Sport Development and Coaching

UCAS Code: SDC2

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

C,C,C

Pass Access Course with 23-45 level 3 credits at Distinction or Merit, with a minimum of 6 level 3 credits at Distinction.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSE English Language at grade 4 or grade C or above

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MMM

UCAS Tariff

96

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Sports development

The Sports Development & Coaching programme will provide prospective students with the opportunity to learn more about the trends, issues and challenges in creating a more active nation, the creation of high-quality sporting opportunities within various environmental contexts, and the crucial role of the coach as part of this process. The programme explores current good practice within more traditional sports development focussed on the ‘development of sport’ and explores issues aligned to the wider impact of sport as a ‘force for social good’ and the transformative impact of sports development and coaching work within the sport and wider wellbeing agenda.

Sport England (2016) and UK Coaching (2017) have provided a new and broader definition of coaching. They define coaching as ‘improving a person’s experience of sport and physical activity by providing specialised support and guidance aligned to their individual needs and aspirations’. Such a statement challenges what we deem to be effective coaching, but also considers the impact of our work in creating high quality sport and physical activity experiences to benefit the health of the nation, lower crime, improve education, or in its purest sense, clearer player and participant pathways to aid retention in community sport. Essentially, coaching can bring individual and personal wellbeing to both the coach and the participant, but perhaps most pertinently can make a valuable, social and economic contribution to society by building stronger and healthier communities. In short, the Sports Development & Coaching programme proposes to help students to understand the role of sports development practitioners, including coaches, in acknowledging their role in contributing to the health, wellbeing, and development of wider society.

The programme has been designed in consultation with students and local industry providers. The programme aligns wider developments in the sports and physical activity sector and through the Chartered Institute of Sport Management CIMSPA endorsement. This captures industry requirements and balances academic, transferable and practical skills across both ‘sports development’ and ‘coaching’ to ensure students are equipped with the relevant work-based knowledge and skills and are prepared for employment or further study.

The modular structure is reflective of the knowledge and understanding required to work across a broad range of sports development and community coaching contexts. The applied nature of many modules, together with the integration of ‘real’ assessments linked to practice with local organisations (including a year long placement at level 5); creates a fantastic opportunity for students to build networks, enhance employability, and gain relevant employment.

The programme will continue to seek to develop the students’ appreciation of the contested nature of both sports development and coaching to ensure they have a sound level of knowledge and understanding of the underlying concepts, theories, principles and cultural contexts of delivering high quality sport and physical activity experiences that can transform individual lives and subsequently communities. It supports students to develop higher level skills and to become critically reflective thinkers through the development of their intellectual and practical skills in applied aspects of sport development and coaching. The programme encourages increasing independence of learning in applied work based and practical settings, with the programme aiming to foster a culture of continued personal and professional reflection amongst all learners to support career development planning. It aims to develop individuals with a strong theoretical and practical understanding of sports development and coaching to enhance ‘professionalism’ within and beyond the sector in line with the work of key accrediting bodies.

Modules

1st year
Introduction to Sport Development and Coaching (immersive module)
Coaching: Process & Practice
Foundations in Sports Development
Sport & Social Issues
Sport Coaching in the Community
Organisation in Sport

2nd Year
Engaging in Employability: Sports Development/Coaching
Sport and Physical Activity Event Management
Sport and Physical Activity Policy to Practice
Inclusion in Sport and Physical Activity
Coaching Theory & Practice
Research Methods

3rd Year
Honours Project
Strategic Sport Management
Leadership & Mentoring in Sport
Coaching diverse populations.
Sport in Society
Graduate Employability in Sport

Assessment methods

Assignment
Case study
Critical Review/literature review
Essay
Evaluation/Evaluative Report
Examination
Honours Project
Online Assessment
Oral Presentation
Portfolio / E-Portfolio / Resource File:/Reflective Portfolio
Poster Presentation
Reflective journal
Report
Research proposal
Coaching practice
Event management practice

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£11,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Plymouth Marjon University

Department:

School of Sport, Health and Wellbeing

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

80%
med
Sports development

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sports development

Teaching and learning

93%
Staff make the subject interesting
90%
Staff are good at explaining things
90%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
89%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

90%
Library resources
92%
IT resources
91%
Course specific equipment and facilities
69%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

96%
UK students
4%
International students
65%
Male students
35%
Female students
68%
2:1 or above
20%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sports development

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£16,500
low
Average annual salary
95%
low
Employed or in further education
60%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Childcare and related personal services
12%
Sports and fitness occupations
11%
Health associate professionals

One of the fastest growing subjects in the country, the number of sports science graduates went from under 3,000 in 2003 to over 10,000 in 2013. Numbers have fallen slightly since 2015, but we still have over 9,000 graduates in the subject. However, the good news is the country's appetite for good health and fitness - and the adaptability of graduates in the subject - means that sports science grads are less likely than average to be out of work. Sports science graduates, not surprisingly, tend to get jobs in sport, fitness and health - coaching and teaching especially - but they're found all over the economy. Management and business are also popular options for graduates from this subject — and sports science graduates are particularly found where drive, determination and physical fitness are an advantage.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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