The page you are visiting was formerly part of the Which? University website, but is now being provided by The Uni Guide — part of The Student Room. For more information please click here.

Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more

Animal Science and Welfare (with Foundation Year)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

32-88

Offers are tailored to individual circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

4.0years

Full-time including foundation year | 2022

Other options

5.0 years | Sandwich including foundation year | 2022

Subject

Animal science

**Note: Due to the type of course delivery and visa restrictions, this course is NOT available to international students requiring a Student Visa**.

**Course overview**: This course includes a foundation year - ideal if you need additional preparation or if you don't have sufficient grades to join Year 1. The course has been specifically designed for those with an interest in animals, their welfare and how science can contribute to solving global challenges facing them. The aim of the course is to prepare graduates for a broad range of careers within industrial, commercial, government and environmental settings and postgraduate study.

The course incorporates three core discipline-based themes, which are developed at each level, as follows: Animal Biology and Biological Sciences, Ecology and Conservation, Animal Welfare and Behaviour.

At our partner institute, East Durham College (Houghall campus), you gain hands-on experience with native and exotic animals. This includes understanding their physiology, nutrition and digestion, husbandry, and management, and how scientific tools and research can benefit the health and welfare of all animal species.

The Houghall Farm site, set on a stunning 476-acre estate, minutes from Durham city centre, is a fantastic place to work with animals. A purpose-built small animal care centre was has several specialist facilities including a snake house, lizard house, tortoise house, aquatics, small mammals house and an aviary. There is also a commercial dog grooming studio, 22-bay dog kennel and a dog agility and walking area. The site is also home to horse riding stables, an arena and commercial pig and cattle facilities. An optional work placement year is included in this course, at no extra cost.

**Top three reasons to study this course at Teesside University**:
1. Hands on practical experience in lab, on the farm, and in urban and countryside settings.
2. A strong scientific foundation in animal science and welfare.
3. Our teaching team includes active and internationally published researchers.

**After the course**: You will be well placed to seek employment in a range of sectors that support animal science and welfare including public services, zoos, wildlife parks, charities, conservation, and animal research. This degree will also provide a strong basis for postgraduate study.

Modules

Access course information through Teesside University’s website using the course details link provided.

Assessment methods

You attend a range of lectures, small-group tutorials, hands-on laboratory sessions and animal handling sessions at Houghall Farm. Part of your course also involves a substantial research-based project.

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to undertake self-study time to review lecture notes, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments.

Your learning involves different types of assessment including coursework, assignments and examinations.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Republic of Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Teesside University

Department:

Life and Physical Sciences

Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Animal science

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

99%
UK students
1%
International students
19%
Male students
81%
Female students
88%
2:1 or above
13%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Agriculture, food and related studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education

Top job areas of graduates

17%
Engineering professionals
17%
Science, engineering and production technicians
8%
Business, research and administrative professionals

These stats refer to the prospects for graduates from both general animal studies courses and those for particular animals (such as equine science). Graduates don't generally get jobs as vets when they graduate; much the most common jobs tend to be roles caring for animals, such as veterinary nurses. Some of these jobs are not currently classified as professional level occupations, but in reality, you need a degree to get these jobs (and probably always have done), and graduates in them report that they got the jobs that they wanted. So the stats you see might not completely represent just how useful these degrees are for getting into animal care careers.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Agriculture, food and related studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
Bangor University | Bangor (Wales)
Zoology with Animal Behaviour
BSc (Hons) 3.0 Years Full-time including foundation year 2022
UCAS Points: 80-112
Lower entry requirements
Plumpton College | Lewes
Applied Animal Behaviour and Conservation
BSc (Hons) 2.0 Years Full-time including foundation year 2022
UCAS Points: 24-56
Nearby University
University Centre Askham Bryan | York
Equine Science and Management (top-up)
BSc (Hons) 1.0 Years Full-time including foundation year 2022
UCAS Points: -
Same University
Teesside University, Middlesbrough | Middlesbrough
Animal Science and Welfare
BSc (Hons) 3.0 Years Full-time including foundation year 2022
UCAS Points: 96-112

Share this page

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here