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Philosophy (Foundation Entry)

Entry requirements


64 UCAS points at A2

64 UCAS points

GCSE/National 4/National 5

5 GCSEs at Grade C/4 or above including Maths and English or equivalent. Equivalent qualifications are Functional Skills Level 2 in Maths and English or Level 3 Key Skills in Maths and Communication.

64 UCAS points at Higher Level subjects

OCR Cambridge Technical Diploma

MM

OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma

MPP

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MM

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MPP

64 UCAS points

64 UCAS points

T Level

P

P (D or E)

UCAS Tariff

64

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subject

Philosophy

**Course overview**
- On our fascinating Philosophy Foundation Entry course you’ll study both traditional and modern European Philosophy as you interrogate what it means to be human and wrestle with some of the most profound issues that have occupied leading thinkers throughout the history of civilisation.

- You’ll explore traditional areas of theoretical philosophy including metaphysics, epistemology, moral theory, and the philosophy of mind and language. You’ll also explore modern European philosophy and applied ethics.

- As the course progresses, you’ll develop the personal and intellectual skills needed for any career that involves thinking, talking or writing about your ideas.

- Our Foundation Entry degree courses are ideal if you’ve got the ability to study for a degree, but don’t have the necessary formal qualifications to directly join an honours programme. It’s a great stepping stone to a full degree.

**Why study with us**
- Philosophy at our University is ranked 1st in the UK for overall student satisfaction, assessment and feedback, and academic support - National Student Survey (NSS) 2019.

- Our Philosophy courses were ranked top in the North West in the 2019 Guardian League Table.

- Our academics are active researchers, working in areas such as bioethics, professional ethics, philosophy of mind and mental health.

Modules

Year 1: Compulsory Modules; Essential Study Skills for Higher Education, Developing Academic Knowledge, Target Award Extended Study, Learning by Experience. Year Long Modules; Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice, Introduction to Education, Childhood and Deaf Studies, Introduction to History, Introduction to Philosophy, Introduction to Sociology, Film and Media Theory, Introduction to Literature, Introduction to Creative Writing, Themes in Archaeology, Introduction to Psychology

Year 2: Compulsory modules: Reason and Argument, Knowledge and Freedom, Problems in Contemporary Applied Ethics, The Value of Knowledge. Options: Science Fiction and Philosophy, Crime and Morality, Politics, Power and the State, + one further ‘elective’ option.

Year 3: Compulsory modules: Metaphysics and Epistemology, Foundations of Ethics, Phenomenology and Existentialism. Options: Philosophy of Mind, History of Political Ideas, Philosophy of Religion, plus one further ‘elective’ option.

Year 4: Compulsory modules: Contemporary Ethical Theory, Modern European Thought, Philosophy Dissertation. Options: Philosophy of Language, Humanity, Values and the Environment, Philosophy and Popular Culture, Contemporary Anglo-American Political Philosophy

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£6,000
per year
England
£6,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£6,000
per year
Scotland
£6,000
per year
Wales
£6,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Central Lancashire

Department:

School of Humanities, Language and Global Studies

Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Philosophy

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
66%
Male students
34%
Female students
57%
2:1 or above
35%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Historical, philosophical and religious studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£16,000
low
Average annual salary
96%
med
Employed or in further education
40%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

18%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
7%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
7%
Other administrative occupations

Although there aren't a lot of jobs around for professional philosophers, philosophy degrees are a relatively popular option, with more than 2,000 students graduating in a philosophy-related subject in 2015 - a little down on previous years, but still healthy. Nearly a quarter of philosophy graduates take a postgraduate qualification, and it's a relatively common subject at both Masters and doctorate level — so if you think academic life might be for you, think ahead about how you might fund further study. For those who go into work, philosophy grads tend to go into teaching, accountancy, consulting, journalism, PR, housing, marketing, human resources and the arts while a few go into the computer industry every year, where their logical training is highly rated.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Philosophy and religious studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

£20k

£20k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
University of Essex
Philosophy and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad)
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
5.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Lower entry requirements
University of Wolverhampton
Philosophy, Religion and Ethics with Foundation Year
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
Liverpool Hope University
Music and Philosophy & Ethics (with Foundation Year)
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
University of Central Lancashire
Philosophy
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here