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Economics and International Relations

Entry requirements


Access to HE Diploma

M:30

Pass Access with 30 Level 3 credits at Merit or equivalent. English (Language or Literature) and Maths GCSE required as separate qualifications at grades A* - C (9 -4).

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

26

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

UCAS Tariff

112

from at least two A Levels. Plus five GCSEs at grades A*–C (9 - 4) including English Language and Maths.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Subjects

International relations

Economics

This course combines an interdisciplinary approach to the study of economics and international relations. The recent coronavirus crisis has demonstrated how the world’s economy is formed of a delicate balance of interconnected countries and their structures, theories and policies – which can have such a profound impact on millions of lives around the world.

During your studies, you will develop a strong understanding of macro and microeconomics, in order to understand the way economists approach and analyse societal problems at the national level, how markets work, and the application of elasticity in the pricing decision of firms.

We build upon the future by learning from the past, so with us, you will discover the historical evolution of international relations theory. From realist and liberal schools to the challenge of Marxist-influenced perspectives, you will explore how theories that draw on philosophies and ideologies shed new light on the discipline. In your final year, you will have the opportunity to undertake independent study in an area of interest within economics or international relations.

**Key features:**

- Broaden your expertise by developing transferable skills such as commercial awareness, communication, team working, independent research and critical analysis.

- DMU is recognised as a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, meaning that it serves as a focal point of knowledge and skills on European Union affairs.

- Participate in real debates such as Congress to Campus, attend conferences and learn from guest speakers. Recently two former congressmen came to DMU to discuss President Trump and contemporary US politics. These visits will give you valuable and informed first-hand insight into contemporary politics.

- Expand your horizons with international travel linked to your course through DMU Global. Previous trip destinations have included New York, Berlin, Greece, Beijing and Copenhagen. As part of the #JoinTogether campaign, students visited the United Nations headquarters in New York to pitch their ideas to improve local communities.

- Our DMU Works team will help you gain sought-after employment skills through placement opportunities with local, national and global companies, previous examples include IBM, Vauxhall, Walt Disney, the NHS and the Government Economic Service.

- Our graduates have progressed onto careers with leading companies such as Deutsche Bank, KPMG, PwC and Revenue Management Analyst at TNT.

Modules

Year 1
Introduction to Macroeconomics
Introduction to Microeconomics
Applied Economic Analysis
Introduction to Contemporary International Relations
Introduction to Globalisation

Year 2
Intermediate Micro and Macroeconomics
Themes and Debates in International Relations Theory
Plus option modules from the following indicative list:
Business Research Issues and Analysis
Economic History
European Economic Issues
Financial Markets and Institutions
New Directions in Economics
Political Analysis
Politics in Action
The Cold War
The Making of a Global World
The Politics of the European Union

Year 3
Development in Advanced Microeconomics
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Plus option modules from the following indicative list:
Developments in Advanced Microeconomics
Economic Development
Economics Dissertation
Financial Markets and the Central Bank
International Trade
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Political Economy
Globalisation and Democracy
Government and Policy in China
International Security in a Globalised World
Politics Dissertation
Behavioural Economics

Assessment methods

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work and self-directed study. Assessment is through coursework (presentations, essays and reports) and usually an exam or test.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£14,250
per year
International
£14,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Leicester Campus

Department:

Business and Law

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

65%
low
International relations
63%
low
Economics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

Teaching and learning

76%
Staff make the subject interesting
86%
Staff are good at explaining things
74%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
60%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

56%
Library resources
77%
IT resources
75%
Course specific equipment and facilities
59%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

79%
UK students
21%
International students
47%
Male students
53%
Female students
83%
2:1 or above
13%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

Economics

Teaching and learning

52%
Staff make the subject interesting
66%
Staff are good at explaining things
71%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
60%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

59%
Library resources
64%
IT resources
69%
Course specific equipment and facilities
49%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

90%
UK students
10%
International students
73%
Male students
27%
Female students
92%
2:1 or above
9%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
med
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
49%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

24%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
11%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
11%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers

The numbers of people taking politics degrees fell sharply last year and we'll keep an eye on this one - it can't really be because of graduates getting poor outcomes as politics grads do about as well as graduates on average. Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Jobs in local and central government are also important. Other popular jobs include marketing and PR, youth and community work, finance roles, HR and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Because so many graduates get jobs in the civil service, a lot of graduates find themselves in London after graduating. Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in five politics graduates go on to take another course - usually a one-year Masters - after they finish their degrees.

Economics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£23,000
med
Average annual salary
92%
low
Employed or in further education
65%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

34%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
21%
Business, research and administrative professionals
13%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals

This is a degree in demand, as business increasingly needs workers who can examine and explain complex data. And yet the number of economics graduates fell by nearly 10% last year, which means demand is even greater. As so many economic grads go into banking and finance, it's not surprising that over half of all 2015's economics graduates who did go into work were working in London. And don't think it's just the finance industry that's interested in these graduates - there's a significant number who enter the IT industry to work with data as analysts and consultants. It's quite common for economics graduates to go into jobs such as accountancy and management consultancy which may require you to take more training and gain professional qualifications - so don’t assume you won’t have to take any more exams once you leave uni. And the incentive to take them, of course, is better pay, which will be on top of an already healthy average starting salary of over £30,000 for graduates working in the capital.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Politics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£21k

£21k

£22k

£22k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Economics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£21k

£21k

£26k

£26k

£28k

£28k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
University of Chester
Economics and International Relations
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Lower entry requirements
Oxford Brookes University
Economics, Politics and International Relations
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Nearby University
University of Warwick
Economics, Politics and International Studies
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022
Same University
De Montfort University
Economics and Politics
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2022

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here