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Nutrition

Entry requirements


A level

C-A*

A minimum of 112 UCAS points from at least two A levels, including Human Biology, Biology or Chemistry at grade C or above

Access to HE Diploma

M:30

Pass QAA Accredited AHE (Science) with a minimum of 30 Level 3 credits at Merit with at least 15 credits at Merit in Chemistry/Biology. English and Maths GCSE required as separate qualifications

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

24

24+ with six higher level points in Chemistry or Biology

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

BTEC National Diploma Science - Distinction/Merit/Merit BTEC Extended Diploma Science - Distinction/Merit/Merit

UCAS Tariff

112

From least two A levels

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2022

Other options

6.0 years | Part-time | 2022

Subject

Nutrition

Diet, nutrition and food are critical to our health and our quality of life. A poor diet can have a significant effect on health and contribute to a range of conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity.

Covering core nutrition science along with medical science, this research-led course combines theoretical and practical elements to take you from farm to fork and science to shelf, and considers the sources and origins of food along with food composition and production.

Our experienced academics bring industry research and knowledge to their teaching. You will study a range of modules that cover nutritional biochemistry,
organ systems physiology, nutrition and metabolism, and health education and promotion. International elements are embedded into the curriculum, allowing you to consider nutrition and health on a global scale.

Practical components will help you acquire skills to further enhance your learning and employability. Optional sandwich year work placements, enabling you to gain valuable experience in an industry setting, are on offer.

Graduates will have the knowledge and skills to work in a range of settings in the public and private sector, from giving nutritional advice to NHS patients to working in the food production industry.

Key features

• Optional work placement opportunities offered through our DMU Works careers programme will enable you to gain experience in an industrial setting.

• Graduates can pursue careers in either public or private sectors, working as qualified nutritionists as well as taking roles in research, education, NHS, public health, the food industry and health journalism.

• Practical components of the course will help you develop professional and personal skills, while the final-year supervised research project will enable you to consolidate your learning and build research skills.

• Benefit from the experiences of expert lecturers, who bring research and knowledge gained in food industry to their teaching.

• International experiences allow you to broaden your cultural horizons and experience different healthcare environments. DMU students have previously had the opportunity to provide healthcare in India, witness the effects of poverty in Florida and help refugees in Berlin.

• You will study a range of modules including human physiology and anatomy, fundamentals of nutritional sciences, nutrition, health and disease, public and global population health.

• The course covers core nutrition sciences dovetailed with medical science and food science related topics, giving a holistic experience of application of nutritional sciences in different areas, e.g. from farm to fork and science to shelf.

**DMU’s careers and employability service, known as DMU Works, was awarded the Best University Careers/Employability Service at the National Undergraduate Employability (NUE) Awards in February 2021. We understand university is a huge investment, and our careers commitment to you is not simply to help you secure a job, but to equip you with the skills to thrive, adapt and innovate in our ever-changing world.**

Modules

First year
• Introduction to Nutrition
• Personal & Professional Skills
• Introduction to Public Health
• Biochemistry & Cell Biology
• Anatomy & Physiology

Second year
• Molecular Genetics & Genomics
• Nutritional Biochemistry
• Organ Systems Physiology
• Immunology
• Nutrition & Metabolism
• Global Public Health
• Evidence Based Medicine

Third year
• Research Project
• Health Education & Promotion
• Population Health
• Clinical Nutrition
• Nutrition through the Lifespan
• Endocrinology
• Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Assessment methods

This is a practical degree and provides instruction in laboratory sciences and human clinical skills, such as measuring BMI and body morphometry.

Health and Nutrition combines quality traditional teaching, such as:
• Lectures
• Tutorials
• Seminars
• Laboratory and clinical skills sessions

with modern educational approaches, and the course is based around a contemporary e-learning hub that provides:
• Podcasts
• Educational videos and animation
• Online quizzes providing a flexible approach to learning

You will be appointed a personal tutor for support, and will gain additional academic support from all other members of academic staff.

Your precise timetable will depend on your modules, however, lectures, seminars, tutorials and face-to-face contact time will normally make up approximately 17 hours of study per week. You will be expected to do approximately 20 hours of self-directed study in addition to this for the completion of assignments and for research projects.

Teaching contact hours

Contact hours in a typical week will depend to some extent on the optional modules you choose to study. However, typically, you will have up to 17 contact hours of teaching and this will break down as:

• Personal tutorial/small group teaching: approx. 4 hours of tutorials (or later, project supervision) each week
• Medium group teaching: approx. 6 hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars each week
• Large group teaching: approx. 7 hours of lectures each week
• Personal study: approx. 20 hours studying and revising in your own time each week, including some guided study using hand-outs, online activities, etc.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£14,750
per year
International
£14,750
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Leicester Campus

Department:

Health and Life Sciences

Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Nutrition

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

87%
UK students
13%
International students
23%
Male students
77%
Female students
83%
2:1 or above
7%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Allied health

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£22,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
66%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

26%
Health professionals
17%
Therapy professionals
10%
Science, engineering and production technicians

This is the subject you need to study if you want to become a dietician — an important job in the country’s healthcare sector, and the single most common job for nutrition graduates. We don’t have many graduates in nutrition every year and with the population becoming more aware of health and well-being and with many medical needs being addressed by the application of specific diets, this is likely to be an area of increasing demand in the future.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Allied health

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

£25k

£25k

£25k

£25k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
Liverpool Hope University | Liverpool
Nutrition
BSc (Hons) 3.0 Years Full-time 2022
UCAS Points: 112
Lower entry requirements
Oxford Brookes University | Oxford
Nutrition
BSc (Hons) 3.0 Years Full-time 2022
UCAS Points: 104

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here