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Falmouth University

English with Creative Writing

UCAS Code: Q3W8

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


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About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

English studies

The technical skills you’ll develop on this course will allow you to succeed in the literary, publishing and content industries. You’ll read critically and widely, learning about historic and current literature, integrating this knowledge into your own work. You can choose to specialise in an area like poetry, non-fiction, scriptwriting or writing for digital games, and learn how to draft, edit and pitch.

Through working on live briefs you’ll gain practical experience with our industry partners in publishing, literary festivals and the writing industries. Throughout the course you’ll learn a wide range of transferable, future-proof skills which are valued in every industry, including the ability to critically analyse, work to briefs and deadlines and produce engaging writing

Modules

This English with creative writing degree seeks to capture and analyse the most vital contemporary writing (across all formats and media) within the context of a rich literary, historical and theoretical past, developing your critical and creative eye.

Learn, debate and create under the guidance of leading academics, industry professionals and diverse guest speakers, whether in The Lighthouse, our state-of-the-art campus facilities, or any of our immediate and beautiful natural spaces.

By making your own choices, you'll build skills in areas like poetry, fiction, non-fiction, screenwriting, and digital games. Be the voice of your community by writing, editing or promoting Falwriting – our student-led online magazine –?gaining vital (and CV-boosting), industry-ready skills.

Live collaborative projects will allow you to make priceless personal connections. Work directly with industry, educational, and community partners, creating a clear path to your desired industry or area of further academic study.

Year one
During the first year of BA English with Creative Writing, you'll explore the basics of creative writing, english literature and publishing – all key areas for aspiring writers to be familiar with. While providing an introduction to the subject, this course also breaks the mould of most English degrees with modules like Exploding the Canon: Writing Then and Now and Breaking the Rules: Remix and Writing Back. Each week, you'll learn through a mix of lectures, workshops and tutorials.

Modules
Writing: Craft & Contexts
Exploding the Canon: Writing Then & Now
Publishing Cultures
Breaking the Rules: Remix and Writing Back
Literatures of Revolution
Publishing Studio: Technologizing the Word

Year two
This year is all about narrowing down to your specialisation. Want to be a screenwriter? There's a module for that. Want to write for games? There's a module for that too. You can take modules in poetry, creative non-fiction or radio and theatre. You'll take two core modules, but otherwise you'll create your own personalised degree, focusing on your specific interests. You will progress to higher levels of analysis and creation, honing your skills as a writer and a critic. You will learn how to research, plan, pitch and build a profile as a writer.

Modules
Society & the Self
Writing Now: Prize-winners, Bestsellers & Controversial Content

Optional modules
Satire and Scandal
Poetry
Screenwriting
Magic and the Impossible
Fiction
Creative Non-Fiction
Games
Radio & Theatre

Year three
The final year of your English and Creative Writing degree is a culmination of the tools and knowledge gained in your first and second years. At this level, you will be working on two major 40-credit modules. In the first, Collaborative Project, you'll work in real-world collaborations; for instance, with community groups, sound projects, work placements and writing projects. We've had students create podcasts, poetry collections, and a range of community projects with partners such as Mind, the National Trust and others.

In the second module, Dissertation and Portfolio, you'll create a sustained piece of work, which you can continue or pitch after graduation. For the portfolio, you will have weekly 30-minute tutorials with your supervisor, allowing you to focus closely on your own writing. You can still choose option modules in the first study block, and in the second we ask you to consider experimentation and adaptation.

Modules
Collaborative Project
Dissertation and Portfolio
Experiment and Adaptation

Optional modules
We Have Never Been Human
Crime and Dark Fiction
Children & Young Adult

The modules above are those being studied by our students, or proposed new ones. Programme structures and modules can change as part of our curriculum enhancement and review processes. If a certain module is important to you, please discuss it with the Course Leader.

Assessment methods

Coursework and e-learning exercises.
Live creative industry briefs.
Final year creative writing portfolio.

The Uni


Course location:

Falmouth University

Department:

The School of Communication

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

74%
low
English studies

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

English studies (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

93%
Staff make the subject interesting
93%
Staff are good at explaining things
88%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
71%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

66%
Library resources
86%
IT resources
83%
Course specific equipment and facilities
38%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

English studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£16,300
low
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
53%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

23%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
12%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
12%
Other elementary services occupations

English is one of the most popular degree subjects and in 2015, more than 11,000 students graduated with English degrees - although this does represent a fall from recent years. As good communication is so important to modern business, you can find English graduates in all parts of the economy, although obviously, you can't expect to get a job in science or engineering (computing is a different matter - it's not common but good language skills can be useful in the computing industry). There's little difference in outcomes between English language and English literature degrees, so don't worry and choose the one that suits you best. More English grads took another postgraduate course when they finished their degree than grads from any other subject - this is an important option. Teacher training was a common choice of second degree, as was further study of English, and journalism courses. But many English graduates changed course and trained in law, marketing or other languages -or even subjects further afield such as computing, psychology and even nursing. This is a very flexible degree which gives you a lot of options

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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