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Film

Entry requirements


We welcome A Levels in a wide range of subjects, especially in those relevant to the course for which you apply.

We may consider a standalone AS in a relevant subject, if it is taken along with other A Levels and if an A Level has not been taken in the same subject. However, you will not be disadvantaged if you do not have a standalone AS subject as we will not ordinarily use them in our offers.

60 credits (with a minimum of 45 credits achieved at level 3) in a relevant subject.

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

24

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

UCAS Tariff

104-120

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points, primarily from Level 3 equivalent qualifications, such as A levels, a BTEC Extended Diploma or a Foundation Diploma, or current, relevant experience. Grade 4 (or C) or above in GCSE English Language, or equivalent, is a minimum language requirement for all applicants. Due to the creative nature of our courses, you will be considered on your own individual merit and potential to succeed on your chosen course. Please contact the Applicant Services team for advice if you are predicted UCAS points below this range, or if you have questions about the qualifications or experience you have.

a minimum of 40 UCAS tariff points, when combined with a minimum of 64 UCAS tariff points from the Supporting Qualifications

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Film studies

Immerse yourself in the world of film, where time, space, form and ideas translate into emotion and meaning. As part of multi-disciplinary teams, you’ll develop your craft through hands- on experience in a specialist facility that mirrors real-world practices.

In developing your understanding and articulating your own response to impactful cinematic storytelling, you’ll engage with the contexts of film culture while developing as a critically aware professional, ready to join our alumni in this fast-moving global industry.

You will:
Get networked, learning from our award-winning staff, together with visiting professionals taking part in masterclasses. In the last year, this has included Carol Morley, Jonathan Glazer, Rubi Shah, Dan Perri, Emily Morgan, Joel Collins and Kim Longinotto.
Develop gradually by learning through doing, engaging in reflective and imaginative thinking and using professional filmmaking production workflows on a course that's endorsed by ScreenSkills, the industry-led skills body for the creative industries.
Get the chance to work on our in-house micro-budget short and feature films through the Sound/ Image Cinema Lab – including Bait (Mark Jenkin, 2019), Make Up (Claire Oakley, 2020), Long Way Back (Brett Harvey, 2020), The Tape (Martha Tilston, 2020), and the forthcoming FilmFour production Enys Men (Mark Jenkin, 2021).

Modules

Building on a range of approaches to cinema through viewing, discussion and analysis, you'll direct your own learning. Choose from pathways including documentary, narrative or experimental short filmmaking, production, post-production editing, grade and sound design, marketing and publicity, and short and feature-length screenwriting.

Learning to create, work and negotiate with others in a productive and collaborative environment will shape you into a dynamic professional.

You'll understand how working with others can help broaden your own thinking and knowledge to give impact, relevance and reach to your creative work.

Our film school boasts Screenskills and CILECT accreditations, which are awarded to courses delivering the very best creative thinking, industry-relevant training, exceptional staff, facilities and partnerships.

Year one:
In the first year of your Film degree, you'll be introduced to the fundamental principles of filmmaking as an art form, industry and cultural object. You'll have the opportunity to get to grips with a variety of skills and craft specialisms and start to think about the wider contexts of film culture and business. The focus of the first year is on laying the groundwork through collaboration, project development and the innovative and groundbreaking moments in film history, helping you to gain a deeper understanding of the filmmaking process and its results. Live briefs, set in a similar mode to those found in the contemporary film and creative industries, will prompt your work. You'll also have the chance to visit an international film festival.

Modules:
Production Cultures 1
Production Cultures 2
Cultural Contexts
Industrial Contexts

Year two:
You'll build on your interests and passions by embarking on specialist pathways - focusing your learning and cinema knowledge in an environment that recognises and embraces the medium’s changing nature. These pathways include gender and representation, experimental film, short and feature film screenwriting, environmental cinema and all aspects of production and post-production. We also offer the opportunity to engage in placements at NBC/Universal Hot House programme.

Modules:
Skills Development
Creative Delivery
Genre
Cinema of Experience

Year three:
In your final year, you’ll continue your work in exploring the wider contexts of film culture and cinema through a dedicated module exploring the voices of The Other. If you’re interested in postgraduate study, you may choose to undertake a dissertation in a cinematic subject area related to your interests. Pursuing filmmaking practice, you’ll immerse yourself in a year-long project of creative cinematic endeavor. You’ll channel your learning into a cinematic object, such as a narrative or documentary film, an experimental film or feature-length screenplay. This year is even more closely aligned to industry practice than the previous, with professionals choosing the work that you’ll create and sitting on assessment panels to judge its development. The artefacts assessed will reflect, in form and content, contemporary film and creative industries practice.

Modules:
Pitch Deck
The Other
Dissertation
Sales Deck

The modules above are those being studied by our students, or proposed new ones. Programme structures and modules can change as part of our curriculum enhancement and review processes. If a certain module is important to you, please discuss it with the Course Leader.

Assessment methods

Continuous assessment with no formal examinations.
Visual, verbal and written assignments.
Dissertation in your final year.

The Uni


Course location:

Penryn Campus

Department:

The School of Film and Television

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

77%
med
Film studies

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media studies

Teaching and learning

84%
Staff make the subject interesting
82%
Staff are good at explaining things
77%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
80%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

84%
Library resources
91%
IT resources
93%
Course specific equipment and facilities
43%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

84%
UK students
16%
International students
56%
Male students
44%
Female students
91%
2:1 or above
11%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Media studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£19,000
med
Average annual salary
90%
low
Employed or in further education
62%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

60%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
9%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
9%
Other elementary services occupations

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Media, journalism and communications

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£14k

£14k

£20k

£20k

£22k

£22k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Explore these similar courses...

Higher entry requirements
University of Southampton
Film and Spanish
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
4.0 years | Full-time | 2021
Lower entry requirements
University of Wolverhampton
Media, Film and Television Studies with Foundation Year
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
1.0 year | Full-time | 2021
Nearby University
Plymouth College of Art
Film Studies
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021
Same University
Falmouth University
Television
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here