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Swansea University

UCAS Code: L202 | Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements

A level

C,D,D-D,D,D

We recognise the EPQ as an excellent indicator of success. If you are predicted a grade B or above in the EPQ, you will receive an offer with a one grade reduction, to include your EPQ with a grade B.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

We require a minimum of 5 passes at Grade A*-C, including Welsh/English Language

UCAS Tariff

72-80

Swansea University recognises the Welsh Baccalaureate - Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate as equivalent to one full A-Level.

About this course

Course option

4years

Full-time including foundation year | 2024

Subject

Politics

Our BA (Hons) Politics degree with a foundation year can open up a range of exciting career possibilities by helping you to develop transferable skills, which are highly valued by employers.

The foundation year gives you an exciting introduction to higher education, exploring the humanities and social sciences before progressing to the full degree programme. It’s ideal if you need a little more support after further education or if you are returning to education after a gap.

Our four-year degree helps to provide graduates with a wealth of inspiring career opportunities thanks to numerous transferable skills which are highly valued by employers.

Politics at Swansea is ranked:
- 6th in the UK for Teaching on my Course (NSS 2023*)

- 3rd in the UK for Student Voice (NSS 2023**)

- 92% of graduates in employment &/or study, or doing other activities, such as travelling, 15 months after leaving Swansea University (HESA 2023)

Based on the average positivity score across questions 1 to 4 in the NSS 2023 when ranked against universities featured in the Times Good University Guide.
* Based on the average positivity score across questions 22 to 25 in the NSS 2023 when ranked against universities featured in the Times Good University Guide.

Your early studies will concentrate on international relations, politics and people. But whether your true passion lies in American politics and society, theories of war, or ethics and justice, our generous range of modules has it covered. This range allows you to learn, discover and narrow your interests for the following years. As one of a select few UK universities, Swansea also offers prestigious modules in British Parliamentary Studies, which includes a visit to the House of Commons in London.

You will have the ability to tailor your degree according to your specific interests as you progress. The second year gives you a chance to study abroad for a semester in the USA, Hong Kong or Singapore, enriching the student experience and boosting your career prospects. Later studies are shaped by modules around your specific political interests, and a substantial dissertation project.

A number of work placement programmes are available to help you prepare for graduate life. Politics students typically develop oral and writing skills through presenting ideas in different formats, supported by strong research and rigorous analysis.

Assessment is conducted through essays, coursework, examination, presentations and a dissertation. Teaching is informed by a vibrant and supportive research environment that unites academics, postgraduates and visiting scholars around shared subject matter and international impact.

Graduates have advanced to careers in sectors such as education, heritage, business, media, politics and humanitarian services.

Modules

In your foundation year, you will explore what it means to be human – studying a range of humanities and social science topics to prepare you for the degree itself and you will complete a project supervised by an expert in the field of education.

Examples of modules include:

• Critical reflection and Problem Solving
• Introduction to Being Human
• Academic Writing and Skills Development

Your first year of study is made up of compulsory modules covering a range of themes. Compulsory modules are studied by all students on the programme, meaning you are automatically enrolled.

Examples of compulsory modules include:

• Introduction to Politics
• Political Philosophy
• Politics and the People

In your second and third year you will study a mixture of compulsory and optional modules, from an expansive range of subject areas.

Examples of optional modules in recent years have included:

• Contemporary Moral Controversies
• Freedom, Angst and the Embodied Self: Themes in Continental Philosophy
• Politics and International Development
• The Aftermaths of War
• Capitalism and Justice: Inequality, Power and Prosperity in Contemporary Economies

Your final year will include a compulsory independent dissertation project.

For the full programme structure and module breakdown, please visit our webpage at: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/social-sciences/politics-philosophy-international-relations/ba-politics/

Assessment methods

We offer a variety of assessment methods within our programmes. In addition to traditional examinations and essays, examples of alternative assessment include:

• Presentations
• Group Work
• Original Writing

Throughout your undergraduate Politics degree, you will develop excellent research and analytical skills and learn to present your ideas effectively both verbally and in writing.

For full breakdown of course structure and assessment please visit our course page: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/social-sciences/politics-philosophy-international-relations/ba-politics/ or get in touch with us at [email protected]

The Uni

Course location:

Singleton Park Campus

Department:

College of Arts and Humanities

Read full university profile

What students say

We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

65%
Politics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

Teaching and learning

81%
Staff make the subject interesting
79%
Staff are good at explaining things
84%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
60%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

59%
Library resources
66%
IT resources
67%
Course specific equipment and facilities
50%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

91%
UK students
9%
International students
69%
Male students
31%
Female students
79%
2:1 or above
7%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

After graduation

The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Politics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
med
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
34%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
12%
Other administrative occupations
8%
Childcare and related personal services

The numbers of people taking politics degrees fell sharply last year and we'll keep an eye on this one - it can't really be because of graduates getting poor outcomes as politics grads do about as well as graduates on average. Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Jobs in local and central government are also important. Other popular jobs include marketing and PR, youth and community work, finance roles, HR and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Because so many graduates get jobs in the civil service, a lot of graduates find themselves in London after graduating. Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in five politics graduates go on to take another course - usually a one-year Masters - after they finish their degrees.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Politics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£19k

£19k

£24k

£24k

£25k

£25k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here