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University College Birmingham

Sports Therapy

UCAS Code: C600

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,C,C

UCB will accept A Level in General Studies for this course and will also take into consideration applicants who are studying an extended project.

Access to HE Diploma

D:15

You will need a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points. A minimum of 15 Level 3 credits at Distinction.

HNC (BTEC)

P

A relevant HNC or a foundation degree with 120 credits.

HND (BTEC)

P

A relevant HND or a foundation degree with 240 credits.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

This can be achieved from either an Extended Diploma or a combination of smaller BTEC qualifications.

You will need a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

UCAS Tariff

104

Level 3 qualifications are accepted at UCB for entrance, a minimum of 96 UCAS Tariff points will be required. If you are unsure if your qualification is accepted call us on 0121 604 1040 or email [email protected]

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Sports therapy

**Course snapshot**

Whether it's working alongside professional footballers or treating sports injuries in a clinic, qualified sports therapists are in demand throughout the sports, health and leisure industries. UCB's Sports Therapy degree course mixes academic study with developing advanced practical therapy skills to prepare you for a range of careers in the world of sport. You'll be supported through your studies by our strong industry links and brand new, state-of-the-art sports facilities. What's more, our course is accredited by the University of Birmingham - one of the world's top academic institutions - while upon graduation you will be qualified to join The Society of Sports Therapists as a Graduate Sports Therapist.

**Who’s the course for?**

Our course is suitable for anyone interested in a career in sports therapy, including working in sports injury clinics, supporting professional athletes or running a sports therapy practice.

**Why should I study the course?**

- **WORK PLACEMENTS** – Gain valuable professional work experience through a variety of placement opportunities – our past students have worked with top-level football and rugby clubs and national teams

- **PRACTICAL APPLICATION** – Apply your therapy skills working in our on-campus clinics and at key sporting events such as the London Marathon and Ride Across Britain

- **ENRICHMENT** – Enjoy a range of industry trips including Therapy Expo, St George’s Park and King’s College London/Wembley Stadium, as well as our annual Sports Performance and Rehabilitation Conference

- **SPECIALISE YOUR STUDIES** – Choose from our portfolio of optional modules to suit your career aspirations and conduct your own research project on a subject of your choice

**Great. Tell me some more**

Our facilities feature an extensive range of equipment, including two purpose-built sports injury/massage clinics, a fully-equipped gym and sports hall, fitness testing equipment, anatomical models and a human performance laboratory. Our new campus building, Moss House, features our cutting-edge Human Performance Centre with the latest equipment and sports technology, as well as a 35-metre indoor running track to assess speed and performance.

You will also have use of the state-of-the-art all-weather pitch at Avery Fields, which we share with leading Birmingham rugby club Bournville RFC. The purpose-built, 15-acre site has undergone a £3 million transformation, with the pitch situated alongside two new grass pitches and an impressive clubhouse including a function room, modern changing facilities and a physiotherapy suite.

Our strong industry links will give you the chance to gain work experience alongside your studies, a key requirement of the Society of Sports Therapists. Our [email protected] team will assist you in finding work to suit your career plans.

You will need to buy a uniform for this course - UCB can help cover the costs for this through our Kick Start scheme.

**What skills will I gain?**

You will gain knowledge of sports injuries as well as how to strengthen and condition muscles.

You will learn about the science of sports therapy through studying anatomy and receive practical training in the techniques of sports massage, along with skills to help support safe training and competition as well as rehabilitating injured athletes.

Our optional modules will allow you to gain further knowledge and skills in specialist areas such as nutrition or sports coaching.

The research project will hone your independent learning skills and give you in-depth knowledge of an industry subject relevant to your career aspirations.

**What about the future?**

Completing this course will prepare you for working in a range of areas within the sports therapy sector. Career options include:

- Sports/health and fitness clubs

- The leisure industry

- Local authorities and the health care sector

- Sports injury clinics

- Health farms

- Self-employed sports therapy

Modules

**Year 1**

- Academic Development
- Exercise Science for Sports Therapists
- Introduction to Sports Injury Management
- Musculoskeletal Anatomy
- Soft Tissue Therapy
- Strength and Conditioning

**Year 2**

- Pathology of Sports Injuries
- Peripheral and Spinal Assessment
- Research for Sports Therapists
- Sport and Exercise Rehabilitation 1
- Sport and Exercise Rehabilitation 2

**Plus one option from:**

- Sports Psychology
- Creative Business Enterprise
- Sports Nutrition
- Sports Coaching
- Athletic Movement Analysis

**Year 3**

- Exercise as Medicine
- Professional Clinical Practice
- Sports Project
- Sports Psychology 2

**Plus one option from:**

- Sports Coaching and the Development of Expertise
- Nutrition for Performance
- Work-based Learning for Sport
- Multidisciplinary Practices in Sport

Assessment methods

**Teaching**

Teaching is carried out by appropriately qualified and experienced lecturers and a typical teaching week will have up to 15 contact hours, made up as follows:

- Large group teaching - 3 hours of lectures in lecture rooms
- Smaller group teaching - 9 hours of teaching in practical areas such as the injury clinics, gym, sports hall and Human Performance Laboratory
- Tutorials - 3 hours per week, including a mix of personal, group and academic tutorials
- Field trips and sports events - Students are encouraged to attend a range of sporting events providing sports therapy and/or massage support to athletes. Examples of such events include the London Marathon and Ride Across Britain.
- Work experience - UCB will support students in sourcing appropriate work placement opportunities

**Individual study**

In addition, you are expected to commit to approximately 20 hours a week of your own study time in preparation for teaching sessions and preparing for and completing assessment. UCB’s online teaching environment provides 24-hour access to resources and support material.

**Assessment**

Assessment is designed to provide you with an opportunity to demonstrate your skills, knowledge and understanding in a number of ways, so a variety of assessment methods are used. This is a competency-based course and, therefore, has a greater emphasis on practical assessment.

An estimated breakdown of the assessment for this course is as follows:

- Coursework - 41%
- Practical assessment - 48%
- Written examinations - 11%

Please note that the information provided above is indicative only and actual timetables and assessment regimes will be issued to students at induction.

Our teaching and assessment is underpinned by our Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy 2015-2020.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£12,500
per year
International
£12,500
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University College Birmingham

Department:

School of Sports and Creative Studies - BA/BSc

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

80%
med
Sports therapy

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sports therapy

Teaching and learning

83%
Staff make the subject interesting
93%
Staff are good at explaining things
87%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
94%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

87%
Library resources
81%
IT resources
81%
Course specific equipment and facilities
86%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

88%
UK students
12%
International students
59%
Male students
41%
Female students
39%
2:1 or above
18%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
B
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sports therapy

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,100
med
Average annual salary
54%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

32%
Health associate professionals
8%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
7%
Sports and fitness occupations

One of the fastest growing subjects in the country, the number of sports science graduates went from under 3,000 in 2003 to over 10,000 in 2013. Numbers have fallen slightly since 2015, but we still have over 9,000 graduates in the subject. However, the good news is the country's appetite for good health and fitness - and the adaptability of graduates in the subject - means that sports science grads are less likely than average to be out of work. Sports science graduates, not surprisingly, tend to get jobs in sport, fitness and health - coaching and teaching especially - but they're found all over the economy. Management and business are also popular options for graduates from this subject — and sports science graduates are particularly found where drive, determination and physical fitness are an advantage.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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