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University of the Arts London

Games Design

UCAS Code: I600

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


TBC

You may also need to…

Present a portfolio

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subject

Computer games design

BA (Hons) Games Design will teach you how to take the software tools of games design and create new gaming experiences. Explore skills sought by industry, such as storyboarding, coding and play testing which will enable you to translate your ideas into playable games.

Working from original concepts, you will develop ideas and test them to evaluate their experience of play. You'll not only design the players interaction with the game mechanics but also the visual feedback needed to communicate the player’s progress, the various gamestates and the behaviours of individual game objects and characters. This concept-to-game approach is supported by the growing theoretical area of games studies. This course is taught at London College of Communication, at Elephant and Castle, part of University of the Arts London (UAL).

**What can you expect?**

You'll be taught in a way that encourages you to regularly generate new concepts and to remain innovative in your practice. You'll learn the design and development skills necessary to put you at the forefront of this growing profession and which are sought after by leading design and software companies worldwide.Key topics covered include interactive design, the psychology of games, designing the experience of play, computer programming and 3D modelling. You'll learn how to write game design documents starting from the initial concept, before mastering the various stages of development. Put your newly acquired skills into practice as you continually build playable games throughout the course. During this process, you'll demonstrate storyboarding and visualisation techniques to communicate ideas with linear or non-linear content. You'll also be expected to analyse gaming trends and identify unique selling points to build into the game's hooks and features; to create your own animated content, adding functionality with scripting before testing for performance and usability. The final major project gives you the opportunity to research an aspect of games design that is of particular interest to you and to present your findings in a dissertation.

**About London College of Communication**

London College of Communication is for the curious, the brave and the committed: those who want to transform themselves and the world around them. Through a diverse, world-leading community of teaching, research and partnerships with industry, we enable our students to succeed as future-facing creatives in the always-evolving design, media and screen industries. The London College of Communication experience is all about learning by doing. Our students get their hands dirty and develop their skills through the exploration of our facilities and technical spaces. Students work on live briefs and commissions, with everything from independent start-ups and charities in Southwark, through to major global companies, including Penguin, the National Trust and Royal Mail, to name a few.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£22,920
per year
International
£22,920
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

London College of Communication

Department:

London College of Communication, University of the Arts London

TEF rating:
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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

87%
high
Computer games design

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer games and animation

Teaching and learning

100%
Staff make the subject interesting
96%
Staff are good at explaining things
86%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
96%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

85%
Library resources
93%
IT resources
89%
Course specific equipment and facilities
68%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

74%
UK students
26%
International students
76%
Male students
24%
Female students
59%
2:1 or above
17%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A
B
C

After graduation


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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

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You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

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Graduate field commentary:

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While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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