The page you are visiting was formerly part of the Which? University website, but is now being provided by The Uni Guide — part of The Student Room. For more information please click here.

Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more

Law and Criminology and Criminal Justice

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

112

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2021

Subjects

Criminology

Law

Criminal justice

From 2021 Law degrees are no longer accredited or approved by either the Bar Standards Board (BSB) or Solicitor’s Regulation Authority (SRA). The WGU programme(s) will prepare students for a career in law by providing some of the academic and professional foundations for sitting the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE) 1 and 2 and the Bar Training Course. The programmes cover necessary legal subjects, referred to in the professional bodies’ qualifying regulations as the Foundations of Legal Knowledge and the SQE1 Functioning Legal Knowledge (FLK) subject areas

Students will complete qualifications the law elements of which have been developed in partnership with legal professionals representing firms local to the University.

The programme will be provided by a team whose Criminology and Criminal Justice programme has been in the top ten in the UK for student satisfaction for three years in a row

The degree will be delivered from a department at the University with almost twenty years’ experience of delivering flexible face to face and online higher education programmes.

The programmes cover the necessary legal subjects, referred to in the professional bodies’ qualifying regulations as the Foundations of Legal Knowledge and the SQE1 Functioning Legal Knowledge (FLK) subject areas

Law degrees, and other degrees incorporating elements of law, are not only a great foundation for careers in law, but also business, and a huge range of careers in the criminal justice and social care arena

The programme will be provided by a team whose Criminology and Criminal Justice programme has been in the top ten in the UK for student satisfaction for three years in a row

Work based modules allow student to develop legal experience.

Modules

Business Law and Practice; Dispute Resolution; Contract; Tort; Legal System of England and Wales; Constitutional and Administrative Law and EU Law and Legal Services; Property Practice; Wills and the Administration of Estates; Solicitors Accounts; Land Law; Trusts; Criminal Law and Practice.

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)

Legal System and Skills (core)
Public Law: Constitutional and Administrative Law(core)
Contract Law(core)
European Law and Global Problems(core)

Criminology and Criminal Justice route:

2 Optional Modules from the departmental portfolio

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)

Criminal Law (core)
Tort(core)
Equity and Trusts(core)
Legal Ethics and Professional Standards(core)

Criminology and Criminal Justice route

• 2 Optional Modules from the departmental portfolio

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)

Property and Land Law (core)
Law Dissertation (core)

Law route (3 options)

Control, Justice and Punishment (option)
Constructing Guilt and Innocence(option)
Employment law(option)
Childhood Law, Policy and Practice (option)

Criminology and Criminal Justice route

• 3 Optional Modules from the departmental portfolio

(module digest is indicative and may be amended)

Assessment methods

Assessment is carried out in accordance with Glynd?r University’s Regulations for Initial Modular Undergraduate Degrees, Diplomas, Certificates, and Foundation Degrees.

Opportunities for formative assessments will feature regularly in order that students can gauge their own benchmarks and plot their own progress. These will include short pieces of writing and on-line exercises. Levels five and six will also include formative assessments but these will be less frequent and more self-directed i.e. students will be expected to be active in identifying their own strengths and limitations.

A range of summative assessments has been designed to encompass rigorous academic requirements and also to accommodate individual differences in preferred learning style. Consequently there is a mix of essays, on-line multiple-choice tests, individual and group presentations and role plays. Exams feature prominently. This is because to become a solicitor in England and Wales from 2021 onwards, two SQA exams must be passed. Accordingly it is prudent to progressively expose students to examination conditions to develop their familiarity and skills in such assessments.

Importantly, some of the assessments have been designed to reflect the professional requirements of legal practice - associated with accurate and professional presentation of evidence/knowledge and self.

Assignments are set in advance and provided to students in module handbooks and marked and returned by module (using the online system Turnitin) with students being given in depth electronic feedback on all assessments within an appropriate timescale determined by University regulations (within 3 weeks). Assessment criteria are published in the student programme handbook issued at the beginning of the academic year, and are drawn from published good practice guidelines.

In order to maintain an approach where students can develop their own interests and refer to their own experiences many assignment questions can be answered from different perspectives. However the design of the assessment task (outlined in further detail in the module specifications) will ensure that the learning outcomes will be met, therefore within a cohort of students there may be several approaches to a single question. Each level entails a similar amount of work from students in terms of the number and lengths of assessment tasks, but the content will become increasingly demanding to reflect the developing complexity of material at each stage. The assessment strategy focusses on assessing achievement in meeting the academic learning outcomes of the programme but with a view, to preparing students for the workplace.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,000
per year
Scotland
£9,000
per year
Wales
£9,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Wrexham

Department:

School of Social and Life Sciences

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

97%
high
Criminology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sociology

Teaching and learning

97%
Staff make the subject interesting
97%
Staff are good at explaining things
97%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
83%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

86%
Library resources
90%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
87%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

99%
UK students
1%
International students
9%
Male students
91%
Female students
67%
2:1 or above
2%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
A
C

Law

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

100%
UK students
0%
International students
29%
Male students
71%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

Social policy

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

82%
UK students
18%
International students
93%
Male students
7%
Female students
67%
2:1 or above
2%
First year drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
A
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Anthropology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

95%
med
Employed or in further education
42%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

32%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
10%
Protective service occupations
10%
Other administrative occupations

We have quite a lot of sociology graduates, although numbers fell last year. But graduates still do pretty well. Most sociology graduates go straight into work when they complete their degrees, and a lot of graduates go into jobs in social professions such as recruitment, education, community and youth work, and housing. An important option for a sociology graduate is social work - and we're short of people willing to take this challenging but rewarding career. Sociology is a flexible degree and you can find graduates from the subject in pretty much every reasonable job — obviously, you don't find many doctors or engineers, but you do find them in finance, the media, healthcare, marketing and even IT. Sociology graduates taking further study often branch out into other qualifications, like teaching, law, psychology, HR and even maths, so don’t think a sociology degree restricts you to just one set of options.

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Sociology, social policy and anthropology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

95%
med
Employed or in further education
42%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

32%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
10%
Protective service occupations
10%
Other administrative occupations

Just over 1,600 students graduated in social policy in 2015, which makes it one of the smaller social studies subjects. This is a popular subject at Masters level — 750 Masters in social policy were awarded last year - and so a lot of the more sought-after jobs in management and research tend to go to social policy graduates with postgraduate degrees. For those who leave university after their first degree, then jobs in social care (especially community and youth work) and education, the police, marketing and human resources and recruitment are popular — along with local government, although there are fewer of those jobs around than in the past. This degree is a bit less reliant on London for jobs than other similar subjects, so if you'd like to work outside the capital, it might be worth considering - although the jobs still tend to be in big cities.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Sociology, social policy and anthropology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£15k

£15k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Explore these similar courses...

Same University
Glyndwr University, Wrexham
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021
Nearby University
University of Chester
Criminology and Law
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021
Lower entry requirements
University of South Wales
Law with Criminology and Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021
Higher entry requirements
University of Liverpool
Law and Criminology
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)
3.0 years | Full-time | 2021

Share this page

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

This is the percentage of final-year students at this university who were "definitely" or "mostly" satisfied with their course. We've analysed this figure against other universities so you can see whether this is high, medium or low.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), for undergraduate students only.

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here